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Red Hat and Fedora Articles/News

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Red Hat
  • Top predictions for 2018 point toward security and innovation

    When thinking about future trends, it’s important to have a strong understanding of the important innovations impacting most sectors, and pair that understanding with an intuition around what impacts those innovations will have to most organizations in 2018.

    Innovation is crucial to federal agencies, but is muted when security becomes a factor. When it comes to impactful trends in the new year, it’s all about three things: security, security, security. Despite the fact that a Ponemon Institute study recently showed that the global average cost of a data breach is down 10 percent over previous years to $3.62 million, according CSO, the average size of a data breach increased nearly two percent. This stat signifies that security will continue to be a top concern for 2018, just as it was in 2017, and will be in 2019.

  • How inner sourcing saved our IT department

    Red Hat is a company with roughly 11,000 employees. The IT department consists of roughly 500 members. Though it makes up just a fraction of the entire organization, the IT department is still sufficiently staffed to have many application service, infrastructure, and operational teams within it. Our purpose is "to enable Red Hatters in all functions to be effective, productive, innovative, and collaborative, so that they feel they can make a difference,"—and, more specifically, to do that by providing technologies and related services in a fashion that is as open as possible.

    Being open like this takes time, attention, and effort. While we always strive to be as open as possible, it can be difficult. For a variety of reasons, we don't always succeed.

  • Red Hat, Inc.’s (RHT) stock price ends at $126.16 with performance of 1.33% on volume of 2098805 shares
  • Traders Secrets on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Nutanix, Inc. (NTNX)
  • Copr Modularity in retrospect

    his article is about the journey that we made since the Fedora modularity project started and we decided to get involved and provide modularity features in Copr. It has been a long and difficult road and we are still not on its end because the whole modularity project is a living organism that is still evolving and changing. Though, we are happy to be part of it.

  • 10 Fedora Women Days across the world

    Different topics were covered during the events, not only for people already familiar with our community but especially for newcomers intrigued by the open source world and willing to join the Fedora Project. This year we presented in Guwahati, Bangalore, Tirana, Managua, Cusco, Puno, Pune, Lima, Brno and Prishtina, spreading the word about Fedora and saying thank you to all the women contributors to our project.

    Even though the events were dedicated to women, everyone of all identities were welcomed to participate or give a talk. We are glad to see how much interest there was in these events in different local communities and how successful they were, making the decision easier for us to organize them again next year.

  • The Fedora 28 Wallpaper Contest is Open for Entries

    If you’re in any way creative, and want to give something back to the Linux community, here’s your chance!

    Fedora is on the hunt for a new set of desktop wallpapers sourced from the open source community.

    The distro invites open source enthusiasts to submit their very best photographs and illustrations for possible inclusion in the add-on wallpaper pack for its next major release, Fedora 28.

  • Submit Wallpaper for Fedora 28 Supplemental Wallpaper!
  • My FLOSS​ Year in Review

    Thanks to the Fedora Project, GNOME, BacktrackAcademy and the Linux Foundation, I was able to organize FLOSS events mostly in Lima, Peru. Besides that, I did a voluntary work as speaker in FLOSS workshops and IT conference in other parts of the world, being interviewed to reach more newcomers into the challenging Linux world, and do online training.

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today's howtos

Linux - The beginning of the end

You should never swear at people under you - I use the word under in the hierarchical sense. Colleagues? Well, probably not, although you should never hold back on your opinion. Those above you in the food chain? It's fair game. You risk it to biscuit it. I say, Linus shouldn't have used the language he did in about 55-65% of the cases. In those 55-65% of the cases, he swore at people when he should have focused on swearing at the technical solution. The thing is, people can make bad products but that does not make them bad people. It is important to distinguish this. People often forget this. And yes, sometimes, there is genuine malice. My experience shows that malice usually comes with a smile and lots of sloganeering. The typical corporate setup is an excellent breeding ground for the aspiring ladder climber. Speaking of Linus, it is also vital to remember that the choice of language does not always define people, especially when there are cultural differences - it's their actions. In the remainder of the cases where "bad" language was used (if we judge it based on the approved corporate lingo vocab), the exchange was completely impersonal - or personal from the start on all sides - in which case, it's a different game. The problem is, it's the whole package. You don't selective get to pick a person's attributes. Genius comes with its flaws. If Linus was an extroverted stage speaker who liked to gushy-mushy chitchat and phrase work problems in empty statements full of "inspiring" and "quotable" one-liners, he probably wouldn't be the developer that he is, and we wouldn't have Linux. So was he wrong in some of those cases? Yes. Should he have apologized? Yes, privately, because it's a private matter. Definitely not the way it was done. Not a corporate-approved kangaroo court. The outcome of this story is disturbing. A public, humiliating apology is just as bad. It's part of the wider corporate show, where you say how sorry you are on screen (the actual remorse is irrelevant). Linus might actually be sorry, and he might actually be seeking to improve his communication style - empathy won't be part of that equation, I guarantee that. But this case - and a few similar ones - set a precedence. People will realize, if someone like Linus gets snubbed for voicing his opinion - and that's what it is after all, an opinion, regardless of the choice of words and expletives - how will they be judged if they do something similar. But not just judged. Placed in the (social) media spotlight and asked to dance to a tune of fake humility in order to satisfy the public thirst for theatrics. You are not expected to just feel remorse. You need to do a whole stage grovel. And once the seed of doubt creeps in, people start normalizing. It's a paradox that it's the liberal, democratic societies that are putting so much strain on the freedom of communication and speech. People forget the harsh lessons of the past and the bloody struggles their nations went through to ensure people could freely express themselves. Now, we're seeing a partial reversal. But it's happening. The basket of "not allowed" words is getting bigger by the day. This affects how people talk, how they frame their issues, how they express themselves. This directly affects their work. There is less and less distinction between professional disagreement and personal slight. In fact, people deliberately blur the lines so they can present their business ineptitude as some sort of Dreyfuss witchhunt against their glorious selves. As an ordinary person slaving in an office so you can pay your bills and raise your mediocre children, you may actually not want to say something that may be construed as "offensive" even though it could be a legitimate complaint, related to your actual work. This leads to self-censored, mind-numbing normalization. People just swallow their pride, suppress their problems, focus on the paycheck, and just play the life-draining corporate game. Or they have an early stroke. Read more Also: Google Keeps Pushing ChromeOS and Android Closer Together