Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Programming/Development: JavaScript, Go, Qt, and GitHub

Filed under
Development
  • Exploring Node.js with Mark Hinkle, Executive Director of the Node.js Foundation

    Even though JavaScript has been around for more than 20 years, it’s becoming the first-class citizen for developing enterprise applications. There is a huge developer community behind this technology.

    What makes things even more interesting is that, with Node.js, JavaScript can run on server, so developers can write applications that run end-to-end in JavaScript. Node.js is very well suited for service applications because server applications are increasingly becoming single function event-driven microservices.

  • As Go 2.0 Nears, AWS Launches Developer Preview of Go SDK 2.0
  • PackageKit-Qt Updated With Qt5 Port, Offline Updates & Performance Improvement

    The PackageKit-Qt project that provides Qt bindings for PackageKit has simultaneously released versions v0.10 and v1.0.

  • PackageKitQt 1.0.0 and 0.10.0 released!

    PackageKitQt is a Qt Library to interface with PackageKit

    It’s been a while that I don’t do a proper PackageKitQt release, mostly because I’m focusing on other projects, but PackageKit API itself isn’t evolving as fast as it was, so updating stuff is quite easy.

  • GitHub Knows

    I was reflecting the other day how useful it would be if GitHub, in addition to the lists it has now like Trending and Explore, could also provide me a better view into which projects a) need help; and more, Cool can accept that help when it arrives. Lots of people responded, and I don't think I'm alone in wanting better ways to find things in GitHub.

    Lots of GitHub users might not care about this, since you work on what you work on already, and finding even more work to do is the last thing on your mind. For me, my interest stems from the fact that I constantly need to find good projects, bugs, and communities for undergrads wanting to learn how to do open source, since this is what I teach. Doing it well is an unsolved problem, since what works for one set of students automatically disqualifies the next set: you can't repeat your success, since closed bugs (hopefully!) don't re-open.

    And because I write about this stuff, I hear from lots of students that I don't teach, students from all over the world who, like my own, are struggling to find a way in, a foothold, a path to get started. It's a hard problem, made harder by the size of the group we're discussing. GitHub's published numbers from 2017 indicate that there are over 500K students using its services, and those are just the ones who have self-identified as such--I'm sure it's much higher.

More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Things to do After Installing Ubuntu 18.04 itsfoss 25/04/2018 - 10:10pm
Story Openwashing: Microsoft, Apple and Symphony Software Foundation Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 10:05pm
Story Linux Foundation: Real-Time Linux (RT Linux), LF Deep Learning Foundation, OpenTracing and More Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 10:04pm
Story Security: Updates, GrayKey, Google and Cilium Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 10:01pm
Story Applications: KStars, Kurly, Pamac, QEMU Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 10:00pm
Story Ubuntu Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:48pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:47pm
Story Red Hat: Storage, Liferay and More Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:40pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:35pm
Story Programming: Node.js, Python, OpenCL, GitLab, GCC Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 9:34pm