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Programming/Development: JavaScript, Go, Qt, and GitHub

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Development
  • Exploring Node.js with Mark Hinkle, Executive Director of the Node.js Foundation

    Even though JavaScript has been around for more than 20 years, it’s becoming the first-class citizen for developing enterprise applications. There is a huge developer community behind this technology.

    What makes things even more interesting is that, with Node.js, JavaScript can run on server, so developers can write applications that run end-to-end in JavaScript. Node.js is very well suited for service applications because server applications are increasingly becoming single function event-driven microservices.

  • As Go 2.0 Nears, AWS Launches Developer Preview of Go SDK 2.0
  • PackageKit-Qt Updated With Qt5 Port, Offline Updates & Performance Improvement

    The PackageKit-Qt project that provides Qt bindings for PackageKit has simultaneously released versions v0.10 and v1.0.

  • PackageKitQt 1.0.0 and 0.10.0 released!

    PackageKitQt is a Qt Library to interface with PackageKit

    It’s been a while that I don’t do a proper PackageKitQt release, mostly because I’m focusing on other projects, but PackageKit API itself isn’t evolving as fast as it was, so updating stuff is quite easy.

  • GitHub Knows

    I was reflecting the other day how useful it would be if GitHub, in addition to the lists it has now like Trending and Explore, could also provide me a better view into which projects a) need help; and more, Cool can accept that help when it arrives. Lots of people responded, and I don't think I'm alone in wanting better ways to find things in GitHub.

    Lots of GitHub users might not care about this, since you work on what you work on already, and finding even more work to do is the last thing on your mind. For me, my interest stems from the fact that I constantly need to find good projects, bugs, and communities for undergrads wanting to learn how to do open source, since this is what I teach. Doing it well is an unsolved problem, since what works for one set of students automatically disqualifies the next set: you can't repeat your success, since closed bugs (hopefully!) don't re-open.

    And because I write about this stuff, I hear from lots of students that I don't teach, students from all over the world who, like my own, are struggling to find a way in, a foothold, a path to get started. It's a hard problem, made harder by the size of the group we're discussing. GitHub's published numbers from 2017 indicate that there are over 500K students using its services, and those are just the ones who have self-identified as such--I'm sure it's much higher.

More in Tux Machines

CPod – A Simple, Beautiful And Cross-platform Podcast App

Podcasts have become very popular in the last few years. Podcasts are what’s called “infotainment”, they are generally light-hearted, but they generally give you valuable information. Podcasts have blown up in the last few years, and if you like something, chances are there is a podcast about it. There are a lot of podcast players out there for the Linux desktop, but if you want something that is visually beautiful, has slick animations, and works on every platform, there aren’t a lot of alternatives to CPod. CPod (formerly known as Cumulonimbus) is an open source and slickest podcast app that works on Linux, MacOS and Windows. CPod runs on something called Electron – a tool that allows developers to build cross-platform (E.g Windows, MacOs and Linux) desktop GUI applications. In this brief guide, we will be discussing – how to install and use CPod podcast app in Linux. Read more

today's howtos

Security: Updates, Anonymity, EFF and Open Source Security Podcast

  • Security updates for Monday
  • For Hackers, Anonymity Was Once Critical. That’s Changing.

    “This is a profession for a lot of people now,” she added. “And you can’t fill out a W-9 with your hacker handle.”

    [...]

    “The thing I worry about today,” he added, taking a more serious tone, “is that people don’t get do-overs.” Young people now have to contend with the real-name policy on Facebook, he said, along with the ever-hovering threats of facial-recognition software and aggregated data. “How are you going to learn to navigate in this world if you never get to make a mistake — and if every mistake you do make follows you forever?”

  • EFF Leader: Security Decisions Are Different When Women Are In The Room
    Women will have their technical credentials doubted throughout their career, said the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Eva Galperin, but being able to participate in important privacy and security decisions makes it worthwhile.
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 115 - Discussion with Brian Hajost from SteelCloud
    Josh and Kurt talk to Brian Hajost from SteelCloud about public sector compliance. The world of public sector compliance can be confusing and strange, but it's not that bad when it's explained by someone with experience.

Android Leftovers