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OSS and Programming Leftovers

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OSS
  • Telecommunications Infrastructure Project looks to apply open source technologies

    The Telecommunications Infrastructure Project is looking to apply open source technologies to next generation fixed and mobile networks.

    The Telecom Infra Project (TIP), conceived by Facebook to light a fire under the traditional telecommunications infrastructure market, continues to expand into new areas.

    Launched at the 2016 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, the highly disruptive project takes an open ecosystem approach to foster network innovation and improve the cost efficiencies of both equipment suppliers and network operators.“We know from our experience with the Open Compute Project that the best way to accelerate the pace of innovation is for companies to collaborate and work in the open. We helped to found TIP with the same goal - bringing different parties together and strengthen and improve efficiencies in the telecom industry,” according to Aaron Bernstein, Director of Connectivity Ecosystem Programmmes at Facebook.

  • Introducing Ad Inspector: Our open-source ad inspection tool
  • AI and machine learning bias has dangerous implications

    Algorithms are everywhere in our world, and so is bias. From social media news feeds to streaming service recommendations to online shopping, computer algorithms—specifically, machine learning algorithms—have permeated our day-to-day world. As for bias, we need only examine the 2016 American election to understand how deeply—both implicitly and explicitly—it permeates our society as well.

    What’s often overlooked, however, is the intersection between these two: bias in computer algorithms themselves.

    Contrary to what many of us might think, technology is not objective. AI algorithms and their decision-making processes are directly shaped by those who build them—what code they write, what data they use to “train” the machine learning models, and how they stress-test the models after they’re finished. This means that the programmers’ values, biases, and human flaws are reflected in the software. If I fed an image-recognition algorithm the faces of only white researchers in my lab, for instance, it wouldn’t recognize non-white faces as human. Such a conclusion isn’t the result of a “stupid” or “unsophisticated” AI, but to a bias in training data: a lack of diverse faces. This has dangerous consequences.

  • Pineapple Fund Supports Conservancy

    Software Freedom Conservancy thanks the Pineapple Fund and its anonymous backer for its recent donation of over 18 Bitcoin (approximately $250,000). The Pineapple Fund is run by an early Bitcoin adopter to give about $86 million worth of Bitcoin to various charities. Shortly after the fund’s announcement earlier this month, volunteers and Conservancy staff members applied for its support. That application was granted this week.

  • Top Programming Languages That Largest Companies Are Hiring Developers For In 2018

    Learning a programming language involves some important decisions on the part of a professional. Gone are the days when one mastered a single popular programming language and it granted job security. Highlighting these limitations of reliance on a single programming language, Coding Dojo coding school has shared the results of an interesting study.

  • Rust in 2018

    I think 2017 was a great year for Rust. Near the beginning of the year, after custom derive and a bunch of things stabilized, I had a strong feeling that Rust was “complete”. Not really “finished”, there’s still tons of stuff to improve, but this was the first time stable Rust was the language I wanted it to be, and was something I could recommend for most kinds of work without reservations.

    I think this is a good signal to wind down the frightening pace of new features Rust has been getting. And that happened! We had the impl period, which took some time to focus on getting things done before proposing new things. And Rust is feeling more polished than ever.

More in Tux Machines

Security: ZDNet/CBS FUD, WiFi4EU, and Krack Wi-Fi

  • Open source web hosting software compromised with DDoS malware [Ed: CBS hired Catalin Cimpanu for him to have a broader platform with which to associate "Open Source" with security issues (does he say "proprietary" when it's proprietary, too?). Microsoft has long financed efforts to associate FOSS/copyleft with security issues and stigmatise it with licensing terror.]
  • Commission tried to hide details of 'WiFi4EU' glitch

    The European Commission has tried to hide information related to technical problems its free wifi fund portal suffered, by claiming that it was "out of scope".

    It released documents to EUobserver following an access to documents request - but heavily redacted some of the key papers.

    However, one of the documents has been leaked and published online. A comparison between the leaked version and the one released by the commission clearly shows that the commission went too far with its redactions.

  • The Flawed System Behind the Krack Wi-Fi Meltdown

    "If there is one thing to learn from this, it's that standards can't be closed off from security researchers," says Robert Graham, an analyst for the cybersecurity firm Erratasec. "The bug here is actually pretty easy to prevent, and pretty obvious. It's the fact that security researchers couldn't get their hands on the standards that meant that it was able to hide."

    The WPA2 protocol was developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), which acts as a standards body for numerous technical industries, including wireless security. But unlike, say, Transport Layer Security, the popular cryptographic protocol used in web encryption, WPA2 doesn't make its specifications widely available. IEEE wireless security standards carry a retail cost of hundreds of dollars to access, and costs to review multiple interoperable standards can quickly add up to thousands of dollars.

Android Leftovers

OpenBSD: New Dnsmasq, New OpenSSH and New OpenBSD

FOSS in Digital Currencies

  • Braiins OS: An Open Source Alternative to Bitcoin Mining Firmware
    The company behind Slush Pool recently rolled out the initial release of its ASIC miner firmware: Braiins OS. The operating system is advertised as “the very first fully open-source, Linux-based system for cryptocurrency embedded devices,” an alternative to the factory-default firmware that comes with most popular mining hardware. Upon visiting the project’s website, visitors are greeted with a clear message, a mantra that resonates with its related industry’s ethos: “Take back control.”
  • Cryptoexchange Coinbase open sources its security scanner tool Salus
    The renowned United States-based cryptocurrency exchange, Coinbase always focuses on the security of its platform. Moreover, it has developed novel solutions to implementing security protocols to further strengthen their security. Furthermore, just recently, they announced that they are listing their security scanner execution tool, Salus as open source.
  • Crypto Exchange Coinbase Open-Sources Its Security Scaling Tool
    U.S.-based cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase is making a recently developed automated security scaling tool available to the public. Called Salus, after the Roman the goddess of safety and well-being, the program can automatically choose to run and configure different security scanners and issue a report on the results, according to a Thursday blog post from Coinbase developer Julian Borrey. Available as an open-source tool on GitHub from today, Salus is said to offer the advantage of being able to centrally coordinate security scans across a large number of software storage repositories, avoiding having to configure a scanner for each different project.