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Games: Endless Horde, ERSATZ, Spartan Fist, Stellaris: Apocalypse, Feral Interactive, Unity (Mono)

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Gaming
  • Endless Horde is a Tower Defense game about protecting your base from a Zombie invasion

    I thought Endless Horde [Steam] looked like it could be a nice Tower Defense game to kill a few minutes since it's cheap, so I took a look.

    Developed by Ominous Entertainment, the game released with Linux support in April of last year. I let it bake a little longer, but even after waiting this long it's not great.

  • ERSATZ, a fast-paced hardcore action platformer with a musical twist adds Linux support

    Can't get enough hardcore platforming? Good news for you, as the colourful and musical ERSATZ [Steam, Official Site] now supports Linux.

    Originally released for Windows back in September of last year, the Linux version arrived two days ago. The developer said it does have two small differences to the Windows build, one being the "L" key being used to dash and a "shockwave" effect when you slam-hit the ground had to be removed due to graphical issues.

  • First-person puncher roguelike 'Spartan Fist' sounds hilarious and it's coming to Linux

    Spartan Fist [Steam, Official Site], a first-person puncher roguelike from Glass Bottom Games looks fantastic and the good news is that it's heading to Linux.

    It's really great to know that Glass Bottom Games will continue to support Linux, as they previously released Jones On Fire and Hot Tin Roof: The Cat That Wore A Fedora so I was hoping they would. Spartan Fist actually features two characters from those previous games too, but you won't need to play them to enjoy this.

  • Stellaris: Apocalypse expansion announced, prepare to fire the Colossus!
  • Game Porter Feral Interactive Is Up To Around 72 Employees

    For those curious about the financial aspect of porting games to Linux and macOS, Feral Interactive has published their 2017 fiscal year results.

    Well known Linux game porting company Feral Interactive that also brings games to macOS/iOS has filed their latest financial data this week with UK's Companies House for their fiscal year ending 31 March 2017.

  • Unity 2018.1 Introducing A "Scriptable Render Pipeline"

    Unity Technologies has rolled out their first public beta for the Unity 2018.1 release. Exciting us about this game engine update is their Scriptable Render Pipeline.

    The Scriptable Render Pipeline is their new real-time rendering architecture. Scriptable Rendering Pipeline (SRP) is still being developed but is designed to exploit the potential of modern systems, particularly GPUs, and to do so in an easy and efficient manner. SRP is designed to be extensible and can be extended/customized using C# code and material shaders.

More in Tux Machines

Debian Development and News

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2018
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • PKCS#11 v2.20
    By way of experiment, I've just enabled the PKCS#11 v2.20 implementation in the eID packages for Linux, but for now only in the packages in the "continuous" repository. In the past, enabling this has caused issues; there have been a few cases where Firefox would deadlock when PKCS#11 v2.20 was enabled, rather than the (very old and outdated) v2.11 version that we support by default. We believe we have identified and fixed all outstanding issues that caused such deadlocks, but it's difficult to be sure.
  • Plans for DebCamp and DebConf 18
    I recently became an active contributor to the Debian project, which has been consolidated throughout my GSoC project. In addition to the great learning with my mentors, Lucas Kanashiro and Raphäel Hertzog, the feedback from other community members has been very valuable to the progress we are making in the Distro Tracker. Tomorrow, thanks to Debian project sponsorship, I will take off for Hsinchu, Taiwan to attend DebCamp and DebConf18. It is my first DebConf and I’m looking forward to meeting new people from the Debian community, learn a lot and make useful contributions during the time I am there.
  • Building Debian packages in CI (ick)
    I develop a number of (fairly small) programs, as a hobby. Some of them I also maintain as packages in Debian. All of them I publish as Debian packages in my own APT repository. I want to make the process for making a release of any of my programs as easy and automated as possible, and that includes building Debian packages and uploading them to my personal APT repository, and to Debian itself.
  • My DebCamp/DebConf 18 plans
    Tomorrow I am going to another DebCamp and DebConf; this time at Hsinchu, Taiwan.
  • Things you can do with Debian: multimedia editing
    The Debian operating system serves many purposes and you can do amazing things with it. Apart of powering the servers behind big internet sites like Wikipedia and others, you can use Debian in your PC or laptop. I’ve been doing that for many years. One of the great things you can do is some multimedia editing. It turns out I love nature, outdoor sports and adventures, and I usually take videos and photos with my friends while doing such activities. And when I arrive home I love editing them for my other blog, or putting them together in a video.

32-Bit Vs. 64-Bit Operating System

This has really been confusing to some people choosing between 32-bit and 64-bit systems. Head over to any operating system’s website, you will be given a choice to download either versions of the same operating system. So what is the difference? Why do we have two different versions of the same OS? Let us solve this mystery here, once and for all. Read more

Convert video using Handbrake

Recently, when my son asked me to digitally convert some old DVDs of his high school basketball games, I immediately knew I would use Handbrake. It is an open source package that has all the tools necessary to easily convert video into formats that can be played on MacOS, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, and other platforms. Handbrake is open source and distributable under the GPLv2 license. It's easy to install on MacOS, Windows, and Linux, including both Fedora and Ubuntu. In Linux, once it's installed, it can be launched from the command line with $ handbrake or selected from the graphical user interface. (In my case, that is GNOME 3.) Read more

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