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Games: Endless Horde, ERSATZ, Spartan Fist, Stellaris: Apocalypse, Feral Interactive, Unity (Mono)

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Gaming
  • Endless Horde is a Tower Defense game about protecting your base from a Zombie invasion

    I thought Endless Horde [Steam] looked like it could be a nice Tower Defense game to kill a few minutes since it's cheap, so I took a look.

    Developed by Ominous Entertainment, the game released with Linux support in April of last year. I let it bake a little longer, but even after waiting this long it's not great.

  • ERSATZ, a fast-paced hardcore action platformer with a musical twist adds Linux support

    Can't get enough hardcore platforming? Good news for you, as the colourful and musical ERSATZ [Steam, Official Site] now supports Linux.

    Originally released for Windows back in September of last year, the Linux version arrived two days ago. The developer said it does have two small differences to the Windows build, one being the "L" key being used to dash and a "shockwave" effect when you slam-hit the ground had to be removed due to graphical issues.

  • First-person puncher roguelike 'Spartan Fist' sounds hilarious and it's coming to Linux

    Spartan Fist [Steam, Official Site], a first-person puncher roguelike from Glass Bottom Games looks fantastic and the good news is that it's heading to Linux.

    It's really great to know that Glass Bottom Games will continue to support Linux, as they previously released Jones On Fire and Hot Tin Roof: The Cat That Wore A Fedora so I was hoping they would. Spartan Fist actually features two characters from those previous games too, but you won't need to play them to enjoy this.

  • Stellaris: Apocalypse expansion announced, prepare to fire the Colossus!
  • Game Porter Feral Interactive Is Up To Around 72 Employees

    For those curious about the financial aspect of porting games to Linux and macOS, Feral Interactive has published their 2017 fiscal year results.

    Well known Linux game porting company Feral Interactive that also brings games to macOS/iOS has filed their latest financial data this week with UK's Companies House for their fiscal year ending 31 March 2017.

  • Unity 2018.1 Introducing A "Scriptable Render Pipeline"

    Unity Technologies has rolled out their first public beta for the Unity 2018.1 release. Exciting us about this game engine update is their Scriptable Render Pipeline.

    The Scriptable Render Pipeline is their new real-time rendering architecture. Scriptable Rendering Pipeline (SRP) is still being developed but is designed to exploit the potential of modern systems, particularly GPUs, and to do so in an easy and efficient manner. SRP is designed to be extensible and can be extended/customized using C# code and material shaders.

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