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Mozilla Leftovers

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Release Management Team: Firefox Release management at FOSDEM 2018
  • Mozilla Reps Community: Reps Council at Austin

    The All Hands is a special time of the year where Mozilla employees along with core volunteers gather for a week of many meetings and brainstorming. The All Hands Wiki page has more information about the general setting. During the All Hands, the Reps Council participated in the Open Innovation meetings as well as had meetings about what 2018 planning. One of our main topics was about the Mission Driven Mozillians proposal.

  • Announcing ESR60 with policy engine

    The Firefox ESR (extended support release) is based on an official release of Firefox desktop for use by organizations including schools, universities, businesses and others who need extended support for mass deployments. Since Firefox 10, ESR has grown in popularity and many large organisations rely on it to let their employees browse the Internet securely.

    We want to make customization of Firefox deployments simpler for system administrators and we’re pleased to announce that our next ESR version, Firefox 60, will include a policy engine that increases customization possibilities and integration into existing management systems.

  • Web. Period.

    Seen from here, EPUB is a technical dead end. The ebook market just cannot absorb newer versions of EPUB any more, and I’m not sure when it will be able to absorb even light incremental changes again. EPUB books based on EPUB 3.0.1 or a light and for once backwards-compatible evolution of 3.0.1, are here to stay for a very, very long time.

  • User Style for bugzilla.mozilla.org

    Yesterday, I was talking with Kohei Yoshino (the person behind the Bugzilla Quantum effort that recently landed significant UX improvements to the header strip) about some visual issues I have on bugzilla.mozilla.org which basically boil down to our default view being a bit too noisy for my taste and not emphasizing enough on the key elements I want to glance at immediately when I visit a bug (bug Status, description, comments).

    Given that I spend a significant amount of time on Bugzilla and that I also spend some time on Github issues, I decided to see if I could improve our default theme on Bugzilla with a user style to make it easier on the eyes and also closer visually to Github, which I think is good when you use both on a daily basis.

More in Tux Machines

More Android Leftovers (Mostly Microsoft's Antitrust Push Against Android)

Ubuntu 17.10 Reaches End of Life, Existing Users Must Upgrade to 18.04

Ubuntu 17.10 reached the end of life on 19th July 2018. This means that systems running Ubuntu 17.10 won’t receive security and maintenance updates from Canonical anymore leaving them vulnerable. Read more

3 big steps toward building authentic developer communities

As more software businesses are selling open source products, we've seen a corresponding rise in the emphasis of building out developer communities around these products as a key metric for success. Happy users are passionate advocates, and these passionate advocates raise overall awareness of a company's product offerings. Attract the right vocal influencers into your community, and customers become more interested in forming a relationship with your company. Doing community building the right way, however, is a delicate balance. Undercut the needs of your user community in favor of driving sales, and your company will face a decrease in adoption and unfavorable brand awareness. Meanwhile, too little focus on the bottom line isn't good for the company. So how can this tension be balanced effectively, especially in a world in which developers are the "new kingmakers" and meeting their sensibilities is a cornerstone of driving corporate purchasing decisions? Over the past year, I've thought a lot about how to do effective community building while building the business bottom line. In this article, I'll outline three big steps to take toward building authentic, productive, sustainable developer communities. Read more Also: A 4-step plan for creating teams that aren't afraid to fail

Amid the 20th anniversary of open source, Tim O’Reilly warns that platform companies built on open-source software have lost their way

It’s rare to hear Chinese philosophy quoted on stage at a software-development conference. But O’Reilly Media founder and CEO Tim O’Reilly invoked the words of Lao Tzu Wednesday morning during the opening keynotes at OSCON 2018 in hopes of convincing those in attendance — many of whom work for the big internet platform companies of our time — that the tech industry needs to return to the spirit of openness and collaboration that drove the early days of the open-source community before it is too late. “We have an opportunity with these next generation of systems, to rebuild, to rethink the future, to discover what does it mean to get these systems right,” O’Reilly said. If the first era of the internet was dominated by open protocols, and the second era was dominated by the rise of huge platform companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook, the third era we’re about to enter presents a chance to get it right again. Read more