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City of Barcelona Kicks Out Microsoft in Favor of Linux and Open Source

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Barcelona city administration has prepared the roadmap to migrate its existing system from Microsoft and proprietary software to Linux and Open Source software.
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City Of Barcelona Chooses Linux And Free Software After Ditching

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