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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 176

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • News: Novell partners with Microsoft, CentOS on Oracle Enterprise
  • Linux, Fedora code names, Mandriva and MEPIS updates, gNewSense

  • Web logs: One month with Mandriva Linux 2007
  • Released last week: OpenBSD 4.0, NetBSD 3.1
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 10.2 Beta 2
  • Site news: Dilemma about distributions linking to DistroWatch
  • New additions: gNewSense, TrueBSD
  • New distributions: Damn Vulnerable Linux, URLI OS

This week in DistroWatch Weekly....

Shameful Attack Hosted By FSF Europe

Despicable, to say the least. A contemptible attack against Ladislav Bodnar (the man behind Distrowatch) was launched on the blog of the unidentifiable person hiding under the nickname of incinerator.

There is no way to find out who's behind this name (P.S.: it's actually Dominik Bódi) — it's just some "fellow" of Free Software Foundation Europe.

"Incinerator" has read the latest DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 176, 6 November 2006 and this was enough to start bashing Ladislav: Ladislav Bodnar sells out?

Full Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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