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Software: BadISO, MusE 3.0.0, Krita, GNOME and More

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Software
  • Announcing BadISO

    For a few years now I have been working on-and-off on a personal project to import data from a large collection of home-made CD-Rs and DVD-Rs. I've started writing up my notes, experiences and advice for performing a project like this; but they aren't yet in a particularly legible state.

    As part of this work I wrote some software called "BadISO" which takes a possibly-corrupted or incomplete optical disc image (specifically ISO9660) and combined with a GNU ddrescue map (or log) file, tells you which files within the image are intact, and which are not. The idea is you have tried to import a disc using ddrescue and some areas of the disc have not read successfully. The ddrescue map file tells you which areas in byte terms, but not what files that corresponds to. BadISO plugs that gap.

  • MusE 3.0.0 released

    Three years after the last stable release, version 3.0 of the MusE MIDI/Audio sequencer is now available. As you might expect there many changes since the last release including a switch to Qt5, a new Plugin Path editor in Global Settings, a mixer makeover with lots of fixes, a system-wide move to double precision of all audio paths, and much more.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Wine, Soundnode, Etcher + More

    Welcome to our first Linux Release Roundup of 2018 — and as you might expect from the first week of a new year, there’s not an awful lot to round up!

    I like to assume that app developers spent their holidays enjoying themselves rather than beavering away on apps for our collective benefit.

    Even so, here are a couple of recent updates – but warning: this post contains Electron.

  • Interview with Emily K. Mell

    That it’s free! I think it’s remarkable that the open-source community could create something of this quality without a money spigot. Given Adobe’s outrageous pricing scheme for Photoshop, you’d think that software like this couldn’t exist anywhere else. Krita is a much better option.

  • Loving Gitlab.gnome.org, and getting notifications

    I'm loving gitlab.gnome.org. It has been only a couple of weeks since librsvg moved to gitlab, and I've already received and merged two merge requests. (Isn't it a bit weird that Github uses "pull request" and Everyone(tm) knows the PR acronym, but Gitlab uses "merge request"?)

  • 7 Best Alternatives To Microsoft Office Suite — 2018 Edition

    Some people need specific features or compatibility with other contacts, and that’s understandable; it’s expected to come at a price. But what about those who don’t need much out of an office software? The average person, even if technically inclined, doesn’t need much out of a word processor (I mean, it’s not like it’s a text editor or anything). So, should you pay for something that you don’t need? Probably none of my business, so I’ll just give you the facts to make an informed decision and select the best Microsoft Office alternative...

More in Tux Machines

Screenshots/Screencasts: Robolinux 10.4 LXDE, deepin 15.9, and Parrot OS 4.5 KDE

Livepatching With Linux 5.1 To Support Atomic Replace & Cumulative Patches

With the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle that should get underway in just over one month's time, there will now be the long in development work (it's been through 15+ rounds of public code review!) for supporting atomic replace and cumulative patches. Read more

GNOME/Xfce/GTK: Exo 0.12.4 and Libhandy 0.0.7 Released

  • Exo 0.12.4 Released
    Exo 0.12.4 is now available with an improved icon view, better icon rendering, and reduced disk usage.
  • My Name is Handy, Lib Handy
    Libhandy 0.0.7 just got released! [...] A common pattern in GNOME applications is lists, which are typically implemented via GtkListBox. More specific patterns arose, where rows have a title at the start, an optional subtitle below it, actions at the end and an icon or some other widget like a radio button as a prefix. These rows can also be expanded to reveal nested rows or anything else that fits the need. So far every application using these patterns implemented the rows by hand for each and every row. It made using these a bit cumbersome and it led to inconsistencies in sizing, even inside a single application. To make these patterns easier to use, we implemented HdyActionRow, HdyComboRow and HdyExpanderRow.

How did you get started with Linux?

The Linux mascot is a penguin named Tux, so we thought it appropriate to celebrate Penguin Awareness Day for the conservation of penguin habitats and talk a little bit (more) about Linux. A few fun penguin facts: These furry creatures are flightless yet part of the bird family. Some are large, like the Emperor penguin, and some are small, like those found in New Zealand. And, the Gentoo penguin is known to swim up to a speed of 21 miles per hour! Now, for the Linux bit. I asked our writer community to describe the moment they learned about Linux or the moment they got it up on running on their machine. Here's what they shared. Read more