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Fedora and Red Hat: New ISO, AArch64, ARM, OpenShift, Kubernetes

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Red Hat
  • F27-20180105 updated isos released

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.11-300 kernel.

  • Fedora 28 Looking To Promote Its AArch64 Server Support

    The latest in the long list of planned features/changes for Fedora 28 come down to an AArch64 promotion.

    Fedora developers are looking to promote their AArch64 / ARM64 / ARMv8 server offerings to being a "primary architecture" for this next Fedora release. The Fedora AArch64 server installer, Cloud images, and Docker base images would be the same status then as the other primary server architectures like x86_64.

  • Video: Red Hat Showcases ARM Support for HPC at SC17

    In this video from SC17, Jon Masters from Red Hat describes the company’s Multi-Architecture HPC capabilities, including the new ARM-powered Apollo 70 server from HPE.

  • PodCTL #20 – Gathering Kubernetes Communities

    Before Kubernetes became popular, we had a suspicion that these trends would happen and we started the OpenShift Commons community. Whereas the Kubernetes community is focused on the technology, the OpenShift Commons community strives to bring together both technologists and practitioners to share knowledge and work to solve common challenges.

  • 5 reasons Kubernetes is the real deal

    I've been to a lot of tech conferences in my life, but there was something different about the December 2017 KubeCon/Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Summit in Austin. Sure, there's a ton of hype around Kubernetes, but it's something more. Not only did attendance go up by a staggering amount vs. 2016 (there were more than 4,000 people in Austin) but it was about who was and wasn't there. The content was solid, the Linux Foundation did its usual fabulous job running the event, but the real highlight for me was about the who.

    [...]

    Many open source projects come from one developer's crazy/beautiful idea, but leave lots and lots to be done before the use cases are built out and proven. In this case, similar to MapReduce/Hadoop, the primary use case and even most key foundational technical elements have been proved out, in production at Google for years.

More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get LibreOffice 6.1, Mozilla Firefox 61, and FFmpeg 4

The month of July 2018 was pretty busy for the openSUSE Tumbleweed development team, and the first two weeks of the month already delivered dozens of updates and security fixes. openSUSE developer Dominique Leuenberger reports that a total of nine snapshots have been released in July 2018 for the openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux operating system series, which follows a rolling release model where users install once and receive updates forever. As expected, these 9 snapshots bring numerous updates and bugfixes. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Linux Kernel/Foundation

  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector
    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector. The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.
  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios
    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios. The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.
  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19
    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.