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Fedora and Red Hat: New ISO, AArch64, ARM, OpenShift, Kubernetes

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Red Hat
  • F27-20180105 updated isos released

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.11-300 kernel.

  • Fedora 28 Looking To Promote Its AArch64 Server Support

    The latest in the long list of planned features/changes for Fedora 28 come down to an AArch64 promotion.

    Fedora developers are looking to promote their AArch64 / ARM64 / ARMv8 server offerings to being a "primary architecture" for this next Fedora release. The Fedora AArch64 server installer, Cloud images, and Docker base images would be the same status then as the other primary server architectures like x86_64.

  • Video: Red Hat Showcases ARM Support for HPC at SC17

    In this video from SC17, Jon Masters from Red Hat describes the company’s Multi-Architecture HPC capabilities, including the new ARM-powered Apollo 70 server from HPE.

  • PodCTL #20 – Gathering Kubernetes Communities

    Before Kubernetes became popular, we had a suspicion that these trends would happen and we started the OpenShift Commons community. Whereas the Kubernetes community is focused on the technology, the OpenShift Commons community strives to bring together both technologists and practitioners to share knowledge and work to solve common challenges.

  • 5 reasons Kubernetes is the real deal

    I've been to a lot of tech conferences in my life, but there was something different about the December 2017 KubeCon/Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Summit in Austin. Sure, there's a ton of hype around Kubernetes, but it's something more. Not only did attendance go up by a staggering amount vs. 2016 (there were more than 4,000 people in Austin) but it was about who was and wasn't there. The content was solid, the Linux Foundation did its usual fabulous job running the event, but the real highlight for me was about the who.

    [...]

    Many open source projects come from one developer's crazy/beautiful idea, but leave lots and lots to be done before the use cases are built out and proven. In this case, similar to MapReduce/Hadoop, the primary use case and even most key foundational technical elements have been proved out, in production at Google for years.

More in Tux Machines

GNOME: Vala Scripting and GNOME Foundation Hackfest 2018

  • Daniel Espinosa: Vala Scripting?
    I’m working with a library called GNOME Vala Language Server (GVls), as a proof of concept for a server that will serve autocompletion, syntax highlighting and that kind of stuff, but found something interesting by accident. I’ve added an interface called Client, may is not it final name, but it allows to locale a symbol in a already parsed file, along with some goodness from other interfaces and implementations, I’ll talk about in another article.
  • GNOME Foundation Hackfest 2018
    This week, the GNOME Foundation Board of Directors met at the Collabora office in Cambridge, UK, for the second annual Foundation Hackfest. We were also joined by the Executive Director, Neil McGovern, and Director of Operations, Rosanna Yuen. This event was started by last year’s board and is a great opportunity for the newly-elected board to set out goals for the coming year and get some uninterrupted hacking done on policies, documents, etc. While it’s fresh in our mind, we wanted to tell you about some of the things we have been working on this week and what the community can hope to see in the coming months.

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