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Programming: Forking Bazaar, Qt 5.9 on FreeBSD, Netlify Reaches 1.0

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Development
  • Breezy: Forking Bazaar

    A couple of months ago, Martin and I announced a friendly fork of Bazaar, named Breezy.

    It's been 5 years since I wrote a Bazaar retrospective and around 6 since I seriously contributed to the Bazaar codebase.

  • Bazaar Version Control System Forked As Breezy

    While the developers acknowledge modern open-source projects should be using Git as their distributed revision control system, if you find yourself still using GNU Bazaar there is now a fork known as Breezy.

    With Canonical not doing much to push Bazaar the past several years, Breezy has been quietly in development the past several months by some independent developers. Breezy is cleaning up Bazaar's bugs as well as porting the code-base from Python 2 to Python 3, which is important with Py2 nearing its end-of-life. This is more work than Canonical developers have done the past few years on Bazaar with many of the company's projects now having switched over to Git.

  • Qt 5.9 on FreeBSD

    Tobias and Raphael have spent the past month or so hammering on the Qt 5.9 branch, which has (finally!) landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree. This brings FreeBSD back up-to-date with current Qt releases and, more importantly, up-to-date with the Qt release KDE software is increasingly expecting. With Qt 5.9, the Elisa music player works, for instance (where it has run-time errors with Qt 5.7, even if it compiles). The KDE-FreeBSD CI system has had Qt 5.9 for some time already, but that was hand-compiled and jimmied into the system, rather than being a “proper” ports build.

  • Netlify 1.0 Launched, More Open Source News

    On Dec. 7, 2017, Netlify announced its open source Netlify CMS project had hit version 1.0, boasting a fully-redesigned UI, a new media library and identity management.

    Mathias Biilmann, CEO of Netlify, told CMSWire Netlify 1.0, “provides an open source alternative to the rising number of proprietary headless CMS offerings that enable how developers actually work today — in Git and increasingly decoupling the front and back end.”

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GNOME/Xfce/GTK: Exo 0.12.4 and Libhandy 0.0.7 Released

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  • My Name is Handy, Lib Handy
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How did you get started with Linux?

The Linux mascot is a penguin named Tux, so we thought it appropriate to celebrate Penguin Awareness Day for the conservation of penguin habitats and talk a little bit (more) about Linux. A few fun penguin facts: These furry creatures are flightless yet part of the bird family. Some are large, like the Emperor penguin, and some are small, like those found in New Zealand. And, the Gentoo penguin is known to swim up to a speed of 21 miles per hour! Now, for the Linux bit. I asked our writer community to describe the moment they learned about Linux or the moment they got it up on running on their machine. Here's what they shared. Read more