Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Leftovers: Containers in Research, Opera, KDE Software, Thunderbolt 3, Android and Chrome OS

Filed under
Software
  • Containers in Research

    Last week, I attended the Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop hosted by the Software Sustainability Institute. Many talks were addressing how containers can be used in a high performance computing (HPC) environment. Since running the Docker daemon requires root privileges, most administrators are reluctant to allow users running Docker containers in a HPC environment. This issue as been addressed by Singularity, which is an alternative conterization technology that does not require root privileges. The nice thing is that Singularity allows importing existing Docker images, which allows you creating a Singularity container from anything that is on Docker Hub. Although I only used Docker so far, Singularity sounds like a nice technology I would like to explore in the future.

  • Opera 50 Web Browser Features Cryptocurrency Mining Protection
  • Latte bug fix release v0.7.3 and some news...

    Latte Dock v0.7.3 has been released containing many important fixes and improvements! Soon at your distro repos or...

  • Discussing the future of Cantor

    It is common to use the new year date to start new projects or give new directions for old ones. The last one is the case for Cantor.

    Since when I got the maintainer status for Cantor, I was working to improve the community around the software. Because the great plugins systems of Qt, it is easy to write new backends for Cantor, and in fact in last years Cantor reached the number of 11 backends.

  • Fedora 28 Aiming For Secure Thunderbolt 3 Support

    If Fedora developers are successful, Fedora 28 will feature secure and properly supported Thunderbolt 3 device handling out-of-the-box.

    Long story short, Fedora 28 will hopefully be featuring Red Hat's Bolt project for dealing with modern Thunderbolt devices. With Thunderbolt allowing for direct access to the PCI Express bus, it opens the system up to DMA attacks and other vulnerabilities. But under Thunderbolt 3 is support for security levels by which devices can be restricted to only DisplayPort acess, user authorization of devices, and secure access. The Linux kernel changes for dealing with Thunderbolt 3 is in place but the user-space portion is not.

  • 8 Best Android Launchers To Enhance Looks And Performance Of Your Device in 2018

    Android’s dominance over other mobile operating systems is mainly due to the endless customization opportunities it provides to its user base. Launchers are one of the most customizable parts of Android. Android smartphones are inoperable without a launcher, which comprises of your home screen and the catalog of all the apps available on your device. So every device comes with a default launcher pre-installed.

  • This is the new Acer Chromebook 11

    Many people diss Chromebooks because they simply don't understand them. No, Chrome OS -- the operating system that powers these laptops -- is not just a glorified web browser. Actually, the OS is a full Linux distribution that is both extremely secure and easy to use. True, they can be deficient for some tasks, such as video editing and hardcore gaming, but let's be honest -- not everyone has those needs. If everything you do is in a browser -- email, web surfing, social media, YouTube, Netflix, etc. -- there is no reason to run Windows and open yourself up to malware and other bad things. Hell, Chromebooks even have Microsoft Office support these days!

More in Tux Machines

Screenshots/Screencasts: Robolinux 10.4 LXDE, deepin 15.9, and Parrot OS 4.5 KDE

Livepatching With Linux 5.1 To Support Atomic Replace & Cumulative Patches

With the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle that should get underway in just over one month's time, there will now be the long in development work (it's been through 15+ rounds of public code review!) for supporting atomic replace and cumulative patches. Read more

GNOME/Xfce/GTK: Exo 0.12.4 and Libhandy 0.0.7 Released

  • Exo 0.12.4 Released
    Exo 0.12.4 is now available with an improved icon view, better icon rendering, and reduced disk usage.
  • My Name is Handy, Lib Handy
    Libhandy 0.0.7 just got released! [...] A common pattern in GNOME applications is lists, which are typically implemented via GtkListBox. More specific patterns arose, where rows have a title at the start, an optional subtitle below it, actions at the end and an icon or some other widget like a radio button as a prefix. These rows can also be expanded to reveal nested rows or anything else that fits the need. So far every application using these patterns implemented the rows by hand for each and every row. It made using these a bit cumbersome and it led to inconsistencies in sizing, even inside a single application. To make these patterns easier to use, we implemented HdyActionRow, HdyComboRow and HdyExpanderRow.

How did you get started with Linux?

The Linux mascot is a penguin named Tux, so we thought it appropriate to celebrate Penguin Awareness Day for the conservation of penguin habitats and talk a little bit (more) about Linux. A few fun penguin facts: These furry creatures are flightless yet part of the bird family. Some are large, like the Emperor penguin, and some are small, like those found in New Zealand. And, the Gentoo penguin is known to swim up to a speed of 21 miles per hour! Now, for the Linux bit. I asked our writer community to describe the moment they learned about Linux or the moment they got it up on running on their machine. Here's what they shared. Read more