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AptonCD - Create a backup of all the packages you have installed using apt-get

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HowTos

Consider this scenario... You are interested in installing GNU/Linux on your machine. Assuming you already have the latest version burned on to a CD, it is a simple affair of popping the CD into your CD drive and starting the instalation. But once the installation is done and finished, you will most certainly want to install additional software apart from the ones bundled with the CD. And if you are using a Debian based Linux distribution such as Ubuntu, you will be using the apt-get method. Over a period of time you would have installed a number of additional software including any packages satisfying their dependencies as well as upgraded some of the software to the most recent version.

The problem occurs when you decide to re-install Linux on your machine. You are forced to start all over again, downloading additional software using apt-get. Personally, I have re-installed Debian or a Debian based Linux distribution umpteen times on my machine. And each time I have wished there was a simple way of backing up the packages which I have previously downloaded and installed via apt-get.

A good samaritan has pointed out to a unique project named AptonCD which allows one to create a CD image (ISO) of all the packages downloaded via apt-get or even the packages in a given repository.

Full Story.

And, introducing mondo

I don't enjoy reinstalling everything, either so I've been hunting for a backup system for a while.

I discovered dar, which seems to me to be way in front of partimage. But my search stopped when I discovered mondo.

If you wish, as I did, that your system is backed up to a bootable dvd, that's what you can get. It doesn't matter whether you installed your software using apt-get or some other method.

For seekers only

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