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Graphics: AMD, Xilinx, Nouveau

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Red Hat
  • AMD Posts Last KFD Kernel Patches For Discrete GPUs, Needed For Upstream ROCm

    AMD has posted their remaining patches for now for getting the discrete GPU support upstream in the AMDKFD "Kernel Fusion Driver" that is part of their ROCm compute stack.

  • Xilinx ZynqMP DisplayPort DRM/KMS Driver Posted

    Xilinx is interested in contributing the latest DRM/KMS driver upstream.

    Xilinx has developed a new DRM/KMS driver for their DisplayPort sub-system that is part of their ZynqMP SoC. The Xilinx ZynqMP SoC has a full display pipeline and two planes and DisplayPort 1.2 encoder.

  • Tessellation Shaders Land For RadeonSI NIR Backend

    The work led by Valve Linux driver developer Timothy Arceri on adding tessellation shader support to RadeonSI's NIR code-path has been merged to Mesa 17.4-dev Git.

    RadeonSI Gallium3D has been working on a NIR back-end for eventually supporting SPIR-V ingestion as needed for OpenGL 4.6 compliance with code sharing with the RADV Vulkan code. Eventually though RadeonSI may eventually switch to using NIR completely as its intermediate representation. But before that can happen, the RadeonSI NIR support needs to get to parity with its existing OpenGL support when tied to TGSI IR.

  • Red Hat's Latest Nouveau Developer Posts Updated NIR Code

    Not only is RadeonSI working on NIR support but Red Hat has begun working on NIR support for the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as part of a compute effort and possible Vulkan support in the future.

    As written about last month, longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst has joined Red Hat and his first public-facing project is developing NIR support for Nouveau. In the original patch series Karol explained he's working on NIR support for Nouveau in order to get SPIR-V (the Vulkan / OpenCL IR) support moving. Their expressed focus right now is on SPIR-V compute support but this would also be a step towards Vulkan for this open-source, reverse-engineered NVIDIA Linux graphics driver.

  • Broadcom's Open-Source VC5 OpenGL & Vulkan Support Improving

    Broadcom open-source driver developer Eric Anholt has written his first status update on the VC5 driver activities of the new year.

    VC5 is the new Broadcom GPU capable of Vulkan and much greater OpenGL capabilities than the VC4 graphics processor most well known for being within current-generation Raspberry Pi devices. Eric has been working on the bring-up of the open-source VC5 driver stack for the past half-year and he continues making progress on getting the VC5 OpenGL Gallium3D driver closer to parity to the long-standing VC4 driver as well as working on "BCMV" as the new Broadcom Vulkan driver still in its early stages.

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Programming: Donald Knuth’s 80th Birthday and More

  • Octogenarianhood
    2018 began for me with an absolutely incredible 80th birthday celebration called Knuth80, held in the delightful city of Piteå in northern Sweden. It's impossible for me to thank adequately all of the wonderful people who contributed their time to making this event such a stunning success, certainly one of the greatest highlights of my life. Many of the happenings were also captured digitally in state-of-the-art audio and video, so that others will be able to share some of this joy. I'll link to that data when it becomes available.
  • Celebrating Donald Knuth’s 80th Birthday

    Don suggests that some of the participants who have a little free time might like to look at a few conjectures about set partitions and generating functions that he has put online at http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~knuth/caspagf.txt

  • Tidyverse and data.table, sitting side by side ... (Part 1)
  • Rcpp 0.12.15: Numerous tweaks and enhancements
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