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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Grab scales to meet business demands with open source IT automation and management

    By deploying Red Hat Ansible Tower, an enterprise open source IT automation and management solution, Grab increased its app uptime to 99.99%, reduced development and deployment time, and streamlined infrastructure management with role-based access and automated deployments. As a result, Grab’s users can access the app when needed, and its IT teams can ensure systems are stable and scale to match feature and user base growth.

  • Beta Testing in the Ever-Changing World of Automation

    The International Standards Organization (ISO) has been focused on the standards around quality versus usability over time. In 1998 ISO identified efficiency, effectiveness and satisfaction as major attributes of usability. In 1999 a quality model was proposed, involving an approach to measure quality in terms of software quality and external factors. In 2001 the ISO/IEC 9126-4 standard suggested that the difference between usability and the quality in use is a matter of context of use. ISO/IEC 9126-4 also distinguished external quality versus internal quality and defined related metrics. Metrics for external quality can be obtained only by executing the software product in the system environment for which the product is intended.

    This shows that without usability/human computer interaction (HCI) in the right context, the
    quality process is incomplete. The context referred to here is fundamental to a beta test where you have real users in a real environment, thereby making the case of the beta test stronger.

    Beta Testing Challenges

    Now that we know why beta testing is so very critical, let’s explore the challenges that are involved with a beta stage.

    Any time standards are included, including ISO/IEC 9126, most of these models are static and none of them accurately describe the relationship between phases in the product development cycle and appropriate usability measures at specific project milestones. Any standard also provides relatively few guidelines about how to interpret scores from specific usability metrics. And specific to usability as a quality factor, it is worth noting that usability is that aspect of quality where the metrics have to be interpreted.

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing #112: Kubernetes 1.9 Release Update with Derek Carr (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Derek Carr talks us through the recent Kubernetes 1.9 release features and functions and reviews what is in the works for release 1.10. The briefing is a great guide to the 1.9 Release which went out the door at the very end of 2017. The 1.9 release had a strong focus on fixing bugs, maturing existing features to beta or stable. For Kubernetes 1.9, “Stability” is a key feature with an emphasis on refining, polishing, scale, and tightening up production matters.

  • Alyeska Investment Group LP Has Cut Red Hat (RHT) Holding; Trimble (TRMB) Sellers Decreased By 25.66% Their Shorts
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Shares Sold by Sterling Capital Management LLC
  • Evercore ISI Boosts Red Hat (RHT) Price Target to $140.00

More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Distribution Reaches End of Life on January 26, 2018

Announced two years ago on November 16, OpenSuSE Leap 42.2 is a minor release of openSUSE Leap 42 operating system series, which brought the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel and KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment, as well as many other improvements and up-to-date components. openSUSE Leap 42.2 was based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2, but it will reach end of life this week on January 26. Read more

Raspberry Pi Alternatives

The phenomenon behind the Raspberry Pi computer series has been pretty amazing. It's obvious why it has become so popular for Linux projects—it's a low-cost computer that's actually quite capable for the price, and the GPIO pins allow you to use it in a number of electronics projects such that it starts to cross over into Arduino territory in some cases. Its overall popularity has spawned many different add-ons and accessories, not to mention step-by-step guides on how to use the platform. I've personally written about Raspberry Pis often in this space, and in my own home, I use one to control a beer fermentation fridge, one as my media PC, one to control my 3D printer and one as a handheld gaming device. Read more

Matrix Voice RPi add-on with 7-mic array relaunches

Matrix Labs has publicly relaunched its FPGA-driven “Matrix Voice” voice input add-on board for the Raspberry Pi and Up board for $55, or $65 for a standalone model equipped with an ESP32. Matrix Labs has shipped its “mostly open source” Matrix Voice Raspberry Pi add-on board for Linux-compatible voice recognition and voice assistant technologies such as Alexa and Google Assistant. The circular board launched in February on Indiegogo, and earned over $130,000 in pledges. The Matrix Voice is now available from the Matrix Labs website for only $10 over the original $45 early bird price. Read more

Programming: Donald Knuth’s 80th Birthday and More

  • Octogenarianhood
    2018 began for me with an absolutely incredible 80th birthday celebration called Knuth80, held in the delightful city of Piteå in northern Sweden. It's impossible for me to thank adequately all of the wonderful people who contributed their time to making this event such a stunning success, certainly one of the greatest highlights of my life. Many of the happenings were also captured digitally in state-of-the-art audio and video, so that others will be able to share some of this joy. I'll link to that data when it becomes available.
  • Celebrating Donald Knuth’s 80th Birthday

    Don suggests that some of the participants who have a little free time might like to look at a few conjectures about set partitions and generating functions that he has put online at http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~knuth/caspagf.txt

  • Tidyverse and data.table, sitting side by side ... (Part 1)
  • Rcpp 0.12.15: Numerous tweaks and enhancements
    The fifteenth release in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp landed on CRAN today after just a few days of gestation in incoming/. This release follows the 0.12.0 release from July 2016, the 0.12.1 release in September 2016, the 0.12.2 release in November 2016, the 0.12.3 release in January 2017, the 0.12.4 release in March 2016, the 0.12.5 release in May 2016, the 0.12.6 release in July 2016, the 0.12.7 release in September 2016, the 0.12.8 release in November 2016, the 0.12.9 release in January 2017, the 0.12.10.release in March 2017, the 0.12.11.release in May 2017, the 0.12.12 release in July 2017, the 0.12.13.release in late September 2017, and the 0.12.14.release in November 2017 making it the nineteenth release at the steady and predictable bi-montly release frequency. Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing GNU R with C or C++ code. As of today, 1288 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further, along with another 91 in BioConductor.