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today's leftovers: OpenWrt/LEDE, Mapzen and More

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  • Now What?

    Linux Journal was a print magazine for 17+ years, then a digital one for the next 7+. What shall we be now? That's the Big Question, and there are many answers, some of which are already settled.

  • Steve Jobs’s worst decision was promoting Tim Cook

    Fifteen years later, 2 billion smartphones have shipped worldwide, and Microsoft’s mobile OS share is just 1%.

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  • Amazon Linux Moves Beyond the Cloud to On-Premises Deployments

    For nearly as long as Amazon Web Services (AWS) has been in operation there has been a Amazon Linux operating system that runs on it. Initially Amazon Linux was just an optimized version of Red Hat's community Fedora Linux, adjusted to work on AWS, but it has evolved over the years.

  • The future of DevOps is mastery of multi-cloud environments

    DevOps is a set of practices that automates the processes between software development and IT teams so they can build, test, and release software more quickly and reliably. The concept of DevOps is founded on building a culture of collaboration between IT and business teams, which have historically functioned in relative siloes. The promised benefits include increased trust, faster software releases, and the ability to solve critical issues quickly.

    That said, implementing a successful DevOps organization requires IT leaders to think more broadly about how to spur a cultural and organizational shift within both their team and the broader organization, as opposed to simply deploying new technologies. A successful DevOps strategy requires a merged focus from both development teams and operational teams on what the company needs to meet its digital transformation objectives. Thus, it is about breaking down siloed groups of people and responsibilities, and—in their place—building teams that can multitask on technical issues and goals.

  • The Linux 2017 GOTY Awards are now open for nominations

    Continuing our tradition and a day later than last year, the Linux 2017 GOTY Awards are now open for nominations.

  • The Markets Are Undervaluing these stock’s: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), KB Home (KBH)
  • Announcing the OpenWrt/LEDE merge

    The OpenWrt and LEDE projects have announced their unification under the OpenWrt name. The old OpenWrt CC 15.05 release series will receive a limited amount of security and bug fixes, but the current LEDE 17.01 series is the most up-to-date.

  • Announcing the OpenWrt/LEDE merge

    Both the OpenWrt and LEDE projects are happy to announce their unification under the OpenWrt name.

    After long and sometimes slowly moving discussions about the specifics of the re-merge, with multiple similar proposals but little subsequent action, we're happy to announce that both projects are about to execute the final steps of the merger.

    The new, unified OpenWrt project will be governed under the rules established by the LEDE project. Active members of both the former LEDE and OpenWrt projects will continue working on the unified OpenWrt.

    LEDE's fork and subsequent re-merge into OpenWrt will not alter the overall technical direction taken by the unified project. We will continue to work on improving stability and release maintenance while aiming for frequent minor releases to address critical bugs and security issues like we did with LEDE 17.01 and its four point releases until now.

    Old pre-15.05 OpenWrt CC releases will not be supported by the merged project anymore, leaving these releases without any future security or bug fixes. The OpenWrt CC 15.05 release series will receive a limited amount of security and bug fixes, but is not yet fully integrated in our release automation, so binary releases are lacking behind for now.

  • GIS company Mapzen to shut down but users can still avail open-source data

    But for the admirers of the company, there is still a silver lining: as the data and code is available in open source and users will still be able to run the projects they built using Mapzen tools, as well as some of the company’s tools. Until February 1, when the company will shut down its APIs and support, users are free to grab all that they require.

  • Driving Open Standards in a Fragmented Networking Landscape

    Once upon a time, standards were our friends. They provided industry-accepted blueprints for building homogeneous infrastructures that were reliably interoperable. Company A could confidently build an application and — because of standards — know that it would perform as expected on infrastructure run by Company B.

    Standards have somewhat fallen out of favor as the speed of digital innovation has increased. Today innumerable software applications are created by innumerable developers at an accelerating pace. Standards — once critical for achieving interoperability — have failed to adapt in this brave new world.

    [...]

    The bottom line is that we need to accept that “the only constant is change.” Innovation in software can bring many good things, but we need to learn how we can eliminate the silos, guard against new ones forming, create better interoperability, and simplify operational complexity. The examples above show that by taking a programmatic approach to standards, this degree of interoperability can be achieved even today.

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More Android Leftovers (Mostly Microsoft's Antitrust Push Against Android)

Ubuntu 17.10 Reaches End of Life, Existing Users Must Upgrade to 18.04

Ubuntu 17.10 reached the end of life on 19th July 2018. This means that systems running Ubuntu 17.10 won’t receive security and maintenance updates from Canonical anymore leaving them vulnerable. Read more

3 big steps toward building authentic developer communities

As more software businesses are selling open source products, we've seen a corresponding rise in the emphasis of building out developer communities around these products as a key metric for success. Happy users are passionate advocates, and these passionate advocates raise overall awareness of a company's product offerings. Attract the right vocal influencers into your community, and customers become more interested in forming a relationship with your company. Doing community building the right way, however, is a delicate balance. Undercut the needs of your user community in favor of driving sales, and your company will face a decrease in adoption and unfavorable brand awareness. Meanwhile, too little focus on the bottom line isn't good for the company. So how can this tension be balanced effectively, especially in a world in which developers are the "new kingmakers" and meeting their sensibilities is a cornerstone of driving corporate purchasing decisions? Over the past year, I've thought a lot about how to do effective community building while building the business bottom line. In this article, I'll outline three big steps to take toward building authentic, productive, sustainable developer communities. Read more Also: A 4-step plan for creating teams that aren't afraid to fail

Amid the 20th anniversary of open source, Tim O’Reilly warns that platform companies built on open-source software have lost their way

It’s rare to hear Chinese philosophy quoted on stage at a software-development conference. But O’Reilly Media founder and CEO Tim O’Reilly invoked the words of Lao Tzu Wednesday morning during the opening keynotes at OSCON 2018 in hopes of convincing those in attendance — many of whom work for the big internet platform companies of our time — that the tech industry needs to return to the spirit of openness and collaboration that drove the early days of the open-source community before it is too late. “We have an opportunity with these next generation of systems, to rebuild, to rethink the future, to discover what does it mean to get these systems right,” O’Reilly said. If the first era of the internet was dominated by open protocols, and the second era was dominated by the rise of huge platform companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook, the third era we’re about to enter presents a chance to get it right again. Read more