Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Programming: LLVM 7.0, FarmBot, Mozilla and Rust

Filed under
Development
  • LLVM 7.0 / Clang 7.0 Is Now Under Development

    LLVM/Clang 6.0 has been branched, thus making LLVM/Clang 7.0 open for development on master.

    The LLVM 6.0 branching has taken place a few weeks earlier than is traditionally done to satisfy an unnamed, large user of LLVM to jive with that company's internal testing processes. The branching / feature development is now over but the release candidates will not begin until mid-January.

  • FarmBot Wants to Cultivate an Open-Source Future for Remote Farming

    “Farm from anywhere” is a phrase we’re likely to hear more and more of as technology enables easier access to fresh, locally grown food. We just wrote about Babylon Micro-Farms, a remote, hydroponic farm you can keep inside your living room. There’s also a healthy urban farming market: thanks to companies like Farmshelf and Smallhold, restaurants, schools, and the average consumer get better access to fresh food and more involved in the food production itself.

  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: New Year's Rust: A Call for Community Blogposts

    ‘Tis the season for people and communities to reflect and set goals- and the Rust team is no different. Last month, we published a blogpost about our accomplishments in 2017, and the teams have already begun brainstorming goals for next year.

    Last year, the Rust team started a new tradition: defining a roadmap of goals for the upcoming year. We leveraged our RFC process to solicit community feedback. While we got a lot of awesome feedback on that RFC, we’d like to try something new in addition to the RFC process: a call for community blog posts for ideas of what the goals should be.

    As open source software becomes more and more ubiquitous and popular, the Rust team is interested in exploring new and innovative ways to solicit community feedback and participation. We’re commited to extending and improving our community organization and outreach- and this effort is just the first of what we hope to be many iterations of new kinds of community feedback mechanisms.

  • This Week in Rust 215

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Mozilla Will Delete Firefox Crash Reports Collected by Accident

    Mozilla said last week it would delete all telemetry data collected because of a bug in the Firefox crash reporter.

    According to Mozilla engineers, Firefox has been collecting information on crashed background tabs from users' browsers since Firefox 52, released in March 2017.

    Firefox versions released in that time span did not respect user-set privacy settings and automatically auto-submitted crash reports to Mozilla servers. The browser maker fixed the issue with the release of Firefox 57.0.3.

  • Mozilla GFX: WebRender newsletter #11

    Newsletter #11 is finally here, even later than usual due to an intense week in Austin where all of Mozilla’s staff and a few independent contributors gathered, followed by yours truly taking two weeks off.

More in Tux Machines

darktable 2.4 Open-Source RAW Image Editor Gets First Point Release

darktable 2.4 arrived last Christmas with numerous new features and improvements, and now users can update to darktable 2.4.1, a minor maintenance release adding support for new digital cameras, including the Panasonic DC-G9 (4:3), Paralenz Dive Camera, Pentax KP, and Sjcam SJ6 LEGEND. It also adds a new filter rule to the Collect module to allow users to more easily find locally copied images, enables blending and masking in the Hot Pixels module, adds a speed boost to the Grain module, implements a debug print when compiling OpenCL kernels, and supports stdout handling on Windows systems. Read more

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Distribution Reaches End of Life on January 26, 2018

Announced two years ago on November 16, OpenSuSE Leap 42.2 is a minor release of openSUSE Leap 42 operating system series, which brought the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel and KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment, as well as many other improvements and up-to-date components. openSUSE Leap 42.2 was based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2, but it will reach end of life this week on January 26. Read more

Raspberry Pi Alternatives

The phenomenon behind the Raspberry Pi computer series has been pretty amazing. It's obvious why it has become so popular for Linux projects—it's a low-cost computer that's actually quite capable for the price, and the GPIO pins allow you to use it in a number of electronics projects such that it starts to cross over into Arduino territory in some cases. Its overall popularity has spawned many different add-ons and accessories, not to mention step-by-step guides on how to use the platform. I've personally written about Raspberry Pis often in this space, and in my own home, I use one to control a beer fermentation fridge, one as my media PC, one to control my 3D printer and one as a handheld gaming device. Read more

Matrix Voice RPi add-on with 7-mic array relaunches

Matrix Labs has publicly relaunched its FPGA-driven “Matrix Voice” voice input add-on board for the Raspberry Pi and Up board for $55, or $65 for a standalone model equipped with an ESP32. Matrix Labs has shipped its “mostly open source” Matrix Voice Raspberry Pi add-on board for Linux-compatible voice recognition and voice assistant technologies such as Alexa and Google Assistant. The circular board launched in February on Indiegogo, and earned over $130,000 in pledges. The Matrix Voice is now available from the Matrix Labs website for only $10 over the original $45 early bird price. Read more