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Linux Mint 19 codenamed “Tara”

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Linux

GTK 3.22 is a major stable release for GTK3. From there on, the theming engine and the APIs are stable. This is a great milestone for GTK3. It also means Linux Mint 19.x (which will become our main development platform) will use the same version of GTK as LMDE 3, and distributions which use components we develop, such as Fedora, Arch..etc. This should ease development and increase the quality of these components outside of Linux Mint.

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Also: Linux Mint 19 "Tara" Slated for Release in May/June 2018, Based on Ubuntu 18.04

Linux Mint Translation Guide

More on Linux Mint 'Tara'

  • Linux Mint project sheds light on next big update

    With the recent release of Linux Mint 18.3, attention has now shifted to the Linux Mint 19.x series which will represent the biggest update the Linux distribution will have seen since 2016. The first of the four releases of the new series, simply known as Linux Mint 19, will be dubbed Tara and all subsequent releases of the series should also begin with the letter T with the second letter going further through the alphabet for each release, for example, the Linux Mint 18 releases were called Sarah, Serena, Sonya, and Sylvia.

  • Linux Mint 19 named 'Tara'

    Unfortunately, 2017 was not the much-fabled year of the Linux desktop. Hell, that might not ever happen. With Windows 10 being such a disappointment for many, however, it is definitely a possibility. Maybe 2018 will be the year...

    One such desktop operating system that consistently delights users is Linux Mint. Today, we get some information about the upcoming version 19. The biggest news is that it will be called "Tara." If you aren’t aware, the operating system is always named after a woman.

Linux Mint 19 Release Date & Features

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