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Linux for humans

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Ubuntu

As Microsoft gears up to release a new version of Windows Vista, the hype about operating systems is in the air again. For most people, the question is whether to upgrade or not, but if you want to try out a new operating system, check out the latest version of Ubuntu.

An operating system built using free and open source software, which means you are free to make copies and share, Ubuntu has quickly become the most popular Linux distribution for home users. And there are a number of good reasons for this. You can get the latest version of Ubuntu (on www.ubuntu.com) working within 10 minutes by booting off the CD and subsequently installing it.

If you have an existing Windows operating system, it will let you choose the amount of free space on the Windows drive you want to allocate to Ubuntu. After installation, the system starts running within half an hour. The new version comes in many languages and it is possible to install it completely in Hindi.

Full Article.

Ubuntu NFO

The previous post was about Fedora Core, which is excellent for anybody who wants a bit more out of Linux than the usual desktop environment (e.g. web development, etc.). Not that you can’t do it in Ubuntu, it’s just that Ubuntu is geared more towards the average every-day user.

When choosing Ubuntu, I recommend getting the alternate version if you want to be able to configure RAID, and the normal version does not bring up the graphical installation program (for whatever reason, the alternate version allows text-only installation, which is fine).

Full Story.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

A pirate’s Ubuntu testimony

My dad, aka. the pirate, just came to me and said he wasmuch more happy with the computer now as it is running Ubuntu Linux than he have ever been when it ran Windows.

This testimony of a pirate shows that you do not have to be neither super intelligent (sorry daddy, but you never where that bright) nor a total geek to run Linux.

Full Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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