Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux on the Desktop: The need for compromise

Filed under
Linux

It has become something of a cliché that Linux has reached a critical point in its development and adoption. However, this is especially true now when we look at what events are lined up to occur in the near future, and particularly in the desktop area.

Perhaps the most visible event is the impending launch of Microsoft's Vista. Try as they might, this new OS shows every sign of needing hardware replacement, some user training, and considerable support staff training to be truly effective in deployment. Particularly note the last two, often cited as reasons why moving to Linux is expensive and fraught with danger. Of course, Linux doesn't have the added disadvantage of needing a hardware upgrade.

The second event on the horizon is the move to 64 bit hardware on the desktop. 64 bit hardware is commonplace in the datacenter and on Unix/Linux workstations, but not so common sitting on the average end user's desktop. Some may argue that 64 bit hardware just isn't needed on an average desktop. Quite probably, the same people said the same of the move from 16 bit to 32 bit desktops, and their children probably argued against the need to move from 8 to 16 bit machines.

Both of these events are natural places for people to pause and reconsider their whole environments, and any conscientious CIO is going to give the non-Microsoft alternatives a really long, hard look.

So, can we expect a sudden and dramatic shift to Linux on the desktop? Unfortunately, the answer is probably no. Unless some changes take place.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Mycroft AI Intelligent Personal Assistant Now Available as a Raspberry Pi Image

It's been very quiet lately for the Mycroft project, an open-source initiative to bring a full-featured intelligent personal assistant to Linux desktops, but it looks like it's still alive and kicking, and it's now available as a Raspberry Pi image. Read more

You Can Now Have All the Essential Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS Flavors on a Single ISO

After informing Softpedia about the release of the Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 Live DVDs, Željko Popivoda from the Linux AIO team is now announcing the availability of Linux AIO Ubuntu 14.04.5. Read more

Benchmarking Radeon Open Compute ROCm 1.4 OpenCL

Last month with AMD/GPUOpen's ROCm 1.4 release they delivered on OpenCL support, albeit for this initial release all of the code is not yet open-source. I tried out ROCm 1.4 with the currently supported GPUs to see how the OpenCL performance compares to just using the AMDGPU-PRO OpenCL implementation. Read more

Canonical to Remove Old Unity 7 Scopes from Ubuntu Because They're Not Secure

Canonical's Will Cooke has revealed recently the company's plans on removing some old, unmaintained Unity 7 Scopes from the Ubuntu Linux archives because they could threaten the security of the entire operating system. Read more