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Terpstra: Don't panic over Novell-Microsoft deal

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SUSE

Life is interesting, isn't it? Who would have guessed at the number of changes in our industry over the past 12 months?

My first reaction to the news of Microsoft's support for Linux was: "Wow! incredible!" Oh, I guess that was the reaction all round.

Then I re-read the Microsoft-Novell announcement and thought about it some more. I wonder if the wording of the announcement is designed to stir up those within the open source movement/community who are branded by the "establishment" as radicals. You know, that is not the first time that has happened!

Taking the high road

My alarm bells are ringing, not because of the announcement but rather over concern that those of us who strive the hardest to protect our liberties might overreact and, in the process, do long-term injury to the cause for liberties in respect of software development.

Full Article.

Novell-Microsoft partnership faces GPL hurdle

The patent cross licensing dealthat Microsoft and Novell unveiled last Thursday will be incompatible with the GPL3 license and is likely incompatible with the current GPL2 license, alleged Eben Moglen, a law professor and open source activist.

Section seven of the current general public license (GPL2) prohibits people or corporations from distributing the GPL code if they have entered into anyagreements that contradict the conditions of the license.

Full Story.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

A shameful sellout of Linux to Microsoft by Novell? Yes!

Meanwhile I read a bit more about the Microsoft Novell cooperation deal. Hell, what an utterly shameful sell-out!

In essence, Novell (and the guys leading it, Ron Hovespian & Co.) have defacto acknowledged that Linux violates Microsoft patents. They bought themselves (as a company) some exclusive "peaceful co-existence" (limited to 5 years from now) with the Evil Empire of Global Software Monopoly.

Full Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: Novell-Microsoft

It's a dog eat dog world, and anyone surprised at Novell's new "partnership" hasn't been watching Novell's piss poor financial performance these last few years.

When the stockholders are looking for heads to put on a pike, you know something is going to change.

Of course I find it amusing that all the tales of devil worship and open source woes come mostly from people using OpenSuse and not from the people who actually supported Novell/SUSE financially by buying licenses. For those that have SUSE enterprise, nothing changes, except that future release might have better AD integration because of the partnership.

Go figure, a company the size of Novell would actually have to sell products and services so that they can employ all their workers and still make a profit to keep their stockholders happy.

Kind of ironic (in a sad way), the once mighty Novell that was champion of the Networked PC market and ate Microsoft's lunch now has to partner up with them in order to stay a float.

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