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Is PCLINUXOS a debian distro or another type?

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PCLinuxOS

Is Codeweavers Cross Office program compatible with PCLINUXOS? I tried to install the beta version earlier today and it would not install. It uses a .sh extension. When I double clicked on the direct download from Codeweavers and I tried to install it, it said it was corrupt. And each subsequent download has said the same. Is it that it is not compatible with PCLINUXOS or is something else the issue.

Also, out of curiousity, are there big differences between PCLINUXOS, Dream Linux and MEPIS?
I have downloaded and used all three, and since they PCLINUX and MEPIS are both KDE based and Dream Linux is XOFC based, aside from the desktop interfaces, I did not see a big difference between them. They are all very stable, and very fast once downloaded and installed on to my local computer. By the Way, Codeweaver installed without a hitch into DreamLinux.

Thanks and regards.

Installing outside repos

Just another point of view, having used PCLinuxOS for over two years and one that likes to do what I want with my own computer, I tend to install software from across the net if I cannot find it in the repositories on PCLinuxOS.

In saying that, I believe most distro's tell you not to do that because if you get into borking the system they cannot help you because you may have changed something in the OS that they may not be aware of when you download out side of the repositories.

PCLinuxOS is a great Distro, and I have never had a problem by doing what I do, but if you do as I have your own data backed up and prepared to do a re-install of your system, as it is would not by fair to the support forums to ask how to fix something, if you are outside of the main repos.

Rodney

Member of Linux Geeks United
Linux Reg. #403050

crashes on K3b - to Walter

As I have also tried the K3b (however on Mandriva) I just assume that your problem is that you tried to burn
a disk with more than 80 min. of sound.

NOTE : If this is a music CD it must be under 80 min. otherwise the program will not
handle it.
For over 80 min. use Nautilus - it works perfect , if you have it.

Success!

Yes you can, but not many

Livecd needs 512 mb of drams and can not add programs.

Yes, you can install programs; not many, though. It uses a ramdisk that overlays the CD's read-only filesystem, but it's pretty small (depending on the amount of memory you have, of course). For example, I had just enough room to install the nvidia kernel modules to get Beryl working from the live CD. (This is why having a "persistent disk image" option would be nice.)

The live CD also ran adequately on a laptop with only 256MB of RAM (it did find and use the pre-existing swap partition, though).

The magic is fading

It had to happen, I suppose, especially when all efforts are going in to the new version. I'm having problems I can't fix and am going to develop an alternative.

~

You'll be back as soon as the stable version is released. It is simply the the best distro. I don't stop looking around either but I know it's PCLinuxOS for me - because it works ... and the community is A!

Registered Linux User No. 401868

~

archie wrote:
it's PCLinuxOS for me - because it works

Hi, archie. The trouble is it isn't working. I'll still try the new version, though.

K3b cd burner / PClinuxOS

I am new to linux and had a dual boot w/winXP Home & PClinuxOS.94 and very much enjoyed this linux OS.

Just a few days ago I upgraded to the PCLOS-2007 test release (which i think is the most beautiful and best linux distro i have seen so far)and everything worked wonderful except when I tried (K3b) to burn a CD ....it crashes.

I tried removing the program then re-installing it ....it helped a little, but again crashed just before i started the burn.

I'm wondering if anyone else is experiencing this problem or maybe i'm doing something wrong???

walter l jones

re: K3b cd burner / PClinuxOS

There were a few reports on the test 1 forum discussion and a coupla suggestions.

Crashes on PCLOS

I've been able to use K3b without any crashing but I've had other applications crashing.

Try posting on the forum and give details of exactly what you did. It may help to remove the k3b files and folders in .kde/share/config | apps

As for me, I'm going to develop my Vector installation further.

PCLOS is a MDK distribution

PCLOS is a MDK distribution there is a big difference in rpm packages and debian is a RPM based distro as far as that codeweavers i know that there is a mdk rpm and you will need kpackage to install it as far as PCLOS it is far more superior than any other distro out there i have used every single distro out there and when i came to PCLOS i stopped i have an older customer base and pclos keeps it simple so everyone can use it.

Mandriva & "package manager" - does not compute

malai5 wrote:
Mandriva ... does have one feature that PC Linux and most other Linux do not have and that is Automated RPM package download and install

There was I thinking I must have been the last person to discover that so many other distros have what Mandriva lacks, i.e. a decent package manager. But no, there is at least one yet to make the discovery.

I wonder whether there is anyone in the universe who thinks Mandriva has an intelligent marketing strategy or, indeed, any strategy? Anyone who thinks its numerous websites are informative and simple to navigate? Anyone who thinks it's set up to compete and prosper?

PC Linux

Hi All

Having tried many Linux distributions, the ones that are most user friendly are PC Linux and Mandriva "One" 2007.
However, Mandriva is only a small distribution compared to PC Linux, in that it has limited in house upgrades. BUT, it does have one feature that PC Linux and most other Linux do not have and that is Automated RPM package download and install. without reverting to the command line. That feature alone makes Mandriva "One" 2007, a shoo in for those crossing over from Windoze.

Apart from that, PC Linux is a very stable, feature packed and beautiful to look at, Linux OS, that I personally use. It just needs the RPM auto install and it would be as close to perfect an OS can be.

Cheers

Malai5

The Further You Go, The Less You Know.
www.mam3.com.au

CLI package install?

malai5 wrote:
Hi All
However, Mandriva is only a small distribution compared to PC Linux, in that it has limited in house upgrades. BUT, it does have one feature that PC Linux and most other Linux do not have and that is Automated RPM package download and install. without reverting to the command line. That feature alone makes Mandriva "One" 2007, a shoo in for those crossing over from Windoze.

Apart from that, PC Linux is a very stable, feature packed and beautiful to look at, Linux OS, that I personally use. It just needs the RPM auto install and it would be as close to perfect an OS can be.

Humm, better look again. PCLinuxOS comes with Synaptic already configured with our repositories. All you have to do is start Synaptic from the menu, click on the package you want to install, and click Apply. You never had to open a terminal to install an rpm from our repos.
Sal

Hi Sal That is correct, if

Hi Sal

That is correct, if the RPM package is in the repository, BUT, if it isn't then it's back to the command line.
As you know, RPM and TAR files are offered by NON "Free" source distributors to update their products that are in some linux distributions, Flash is one that springs to mind and was updated in Mandriva for Firefox. Another one was the VMware Beta 6.0 tools package that I needed.In Mandriva "One" 20et the07, it was automatic, in PClinux it was done through a terminal as root. No, not hard, once you get the hang of it, but a definate put off for the new emigrants from Windoze.

Think about it Sal, it would make PClinux just perfect.

Cheers

Malai5

The Further You Go, The Less You Know.
www.mam3.com.au

Broken packages and dependencies

We at the PCLinuxOS community have this much said warning to users wishing to install "outside" packages. Do it at your own risk. And in doing so there won't be support offered. The best deal is to make a software request in the forum, complete with links and what it's for, and if you get lucky, the devs would be quick on it.

There are literally a load of apps one can install from the PCLinuxOS repository.

Best regards

Registered Linux User No. 401868

It is no problem

to install Crossover Office on PCLinuxOS. You just have to follow the instructions on Codeweaver's website.

Did you install PCLinuxOS to your hard drive? If so, you should have seen the New User Guide icon on your desktop. Have you clicked that icon? It will take you to the new user's wiki site. The wiki site won't answer this specific question, but it will lead you to the PCLinuxOS support site, http://www.pclinuxos.com/forum/index.php .
Posting your question there will result in numerous replies to your question.

To specifically answer your question, a .sh file is used so that you can install the program on Linux, no matter what package manager it uses. It won't matter if it's Debian, RedHat, or Slackware, .deb-based, .rpm-based, or .tgz-based.

To install the software package you downloaded, open a terminal window. Change to the directory (cd) the downloaded file is in. Type chmod+x install-crossover-standard-prerelease-6.0.0beta3.sh. (I am assuming that is the name of the file you downloaded.) Then type sh install-crossover-standard-prerelease-6.0.0beta3.sh. The installation will begin.

You can't just double-click the file to install it. If you still don't understand, post your question on the forum @ http://www.pclinuxos.com/forum/index.php .

The following is an example of what you would type in the terminal window:

cd Downloads
chmod +x install-crossover-standard-prerelease-6.0.0beta3.sh
sh install-crossover-standard-prerelease-6.0.0beta3.sh

It's RPM based...

PCLinuxOS is an rpm-based distro unlike Debian or other Debian-based stuff. Maybe that's why CrossOffice has issues with it? I'm sorry, I've never used CrossOffice.

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