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Next Gen Firefox In Beta Tests

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Moz/FF

Fans of Firefox (that’s the world, apart from Jalal) have mood to be jubilant today. The next generation of the phenomenally popular browser has entered beta testing.

We’re not talking version 1.0x here either, we’re talking the real deal. Codenamed “Deer Park Alpha 1”, Mozilla describes it as “a very early stage version of our next generation browser”.

Frustratingly, the company doesn’t go into any specifics about what innovations we can expect to see from Firefox 2. Instead it talks in generalities, speaking of:

  • Performance Improvements

  • Support for modern standards like CSS3, SVG and E4X
  • Upgrades to the extension mechanism

I’d love to get my hands on Deer Park Alpha 1, but unfortunately it is only being shipped to developers and a close knit testing community at this stage. Still, I have a sneaking suspicion it will somehow end up on bittorent before the end of the week. (Hell, if "Revenge of the Sith" can...)

And for those of you not part of the 52 million to download Firefox since version 1.0 debuted in November, do yourselves a favour and take the plunge. You’ll thank me later.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu LTS Updates (16.04 and 18.04)

  • Xenial 16.04.4 Call For Testing (All Flavours)
    Some time ago our first release candidate builds for all flavours that released with xenial have been posted to the ISO tracker [1] into the 16.04.4 milestone. As with each point-release, we would need volunteers to grab the ISOs of their flavour/flavours of choice and perform general testing. We obviously are mostly looking for regressions from 16.04.3, but please fill in any bugs you encounter (against the respective source packages on Launchpad). There is still time until the target release date on 1st of March, but for now we're not considering pulling in any more fixes besides ones for potential release-blockers that we encounter. With enough luck the images that have been made available just now might be the ones we release on Thursday.
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver — Release Date And 9 Biggest Features
    Following the release of Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark, Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth announced that Ubuntu 18.04, which would be an LTS release, is going to be called “Bionic Beaver.” While Beaver refers to a large, amphibious rodent with smooth fur and sharp teeth, Bionic is an ode to the robotics and artificial body parts. We also conducted a little poll on Fossbytes regarding the name. About 80% visitors loved the codename. Others suggested names like Ballsy Baboon, Busy Bee, Bumble Bee, etc. This also brings us to the next step, i.e., exploring what could be the expected features of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. In case you’re running an LTS release and planning to make perform the upgrade to 18.04, things are surely going to be pretty exciting for you.

today's howtos

Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • One-stop counterfeit certificate shops for all your malware-signing needs

    The Stuxnet worm that targeted Iran's nuclear program almost a decade ago was a watershed piece of malware for a variety of reasons. Chief among them, its use of cryptographic certificates belonging to legitimate companies to falsely vouch for the trustworthiness of the malware. Last year, we learned that fraudulently signed malware was more widespread than previously believed. On Thursday, researchers unveiled one possible reason: underground services that since 2011 have sold counterfeit signing credentials that are unique to each buyer.

  • How did OurMine hackers use DNS poisoning to attack WikiLeaks? [Ed: False. They did not attack Wikileaks; they attacked the DNS servers/framework. The corporate media misreported this at the time.
    The OurMine hacking group recently used DNS poisoning to attack WikiLeaks and take over its web address. Learn how this attack was performed from expert Nick Lewis.
  • Intel didn't give government advance notice on chip flaws

    Google researchers informed Intel of flaws in its chips in June. The company explained in its own letter to lawmakers that it left up to Intel informing the government of the flaws.

    Intel said that it did not notify the government at the time because it had “no indication of any exploitation by malicious actors,” and wanted to keep knowledge of the breach limited while it and other companies worked to patch the issue.

    The company let some Chinese technology companies know about the vulnerabilities, which government officials fear may mean the information was passed along to the Chinese government, according to The Wall Street Journal.

  • Intel hid CPU bugs info from govt 'until public disclosure'

    As iTWire reported recently, Intel faces a total of 33 lawsuits over the two flaws. Additionally, the Boston law firm of Block & Leviton is preparing a class action lawsuit against Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich for allegedly selling a vast majority of his Intel stock after the company was notified of the two security flaws and before they became public.

  • Intel did not tell U.S. cyber officials about chip flaws until made public [iophk: "yeah right"]

    Current and former U.S. government officials have raised concerns that the government was not informed of the flaws before they became public because the flaws potentially held national security implications. Intel said it did not think the flaws needed to be shared with U.S. authorities as hackers [sic] had not exploited the vulnerabilities.

  • LA Times serving cryptocurrency mining script [iophk: "JS"]

    The S3 bucket used by the LA Times is apparently world-writable and an ethical hacker [sic] appears to have left a warning in the repository, warning of possible misuse and asking the owner to secure the bucket.

  • Facebook's Mandatory Malware Scan Is an Intrusive Mess

    When an Oregon science fiction writer named Charity tried to log onto Facebook on February 11, she found herself completely locked out of her account. A message appeared saying she needed to download Facebook’s malware scanner if she wanted to get back in. Charity couldn’t use Facebook until she completed the scan, but the file the company provided was for a Windows device—Charity uses a Mac.

  • Tinder plugs flaw that enabled account takeover using just a phone number

    As Tinder uses Facebook profile pics for its users to lure in a mate or several, the 'dating' app is somewhat tied to the social network. When a swipe-hungry Tinder user comes to login to their account they can either do so via Facebook or use their mobile number.

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