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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Oracle open sources Kubernetes deployment, multi-cluster management tools

    Oracle announced at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon it is open sourcing Fn project Kubernetes Installer and Global Multi-Cluster Management, two projects made to aid the development of the next generation of container native applications using Kubernetes.

    Kubernetes is a platform that allows developers to launch container clusters using advanced cloud native capabilities. Oracle originally released Fn, an open-source, cloud agnostic, serverless platform, in October. It comprises four main components, including Fn Server, Fn FDKs, Fn Flow and Fn Load Balancer. The Fn project Installer follows the foot trails of the Fn project, enabling developers to run serverless deployments on any Kubernetes environment.

  • 6 Best Open Source Reddit Alternatives You Must Visit

    A couple of months ago, Reddit announced its plans to stop sharing its main website’s open source code base. The website gave a number of reasons, which weren’t welcomed by the open source community. So, we’ve decided to prepare a list of some free and open source Reddit alternatives that you can give a try. Some of these aren’t much popular, but we thought it’s a good time to spread the world and tell you about these options.

  • Cumulus Networks brings its open source software stack to Voyager

    Telcos have witnessed many years of legacy, closed systems that have stunted development and made it costly to interconnect data centres and networks.The industry is now seeing the commoditisation of hardware and software and the use of open transparanet technologies to drive down costs and provide access to more people.

  • An Open-Source Smartphone Microscope

    A research team led by Wei-Chuan Shih from the University of Houston, USA, reports creating a multicolor fluorescence microscope from a smartphone and a 3-D printer—and they’ve made the computer-aided designs available online for free (Biomed. Opt. Express, doi: 10.1364/BOE.8.005075). The scientists say the smartphone microscope, outfitted with a 3-D inkjet-printed elastomer lens and a polylactic-acid (PLA) housing, could help equip researchers and healthcare providers in developing and rural areas, as well as hobbyists and backpackers, with imaging techniques for diagnostic functions, including detecting waterborne pathogens.

More in Tux Machines

OSS/Microsoft Openwashing Leftovers

Brave and Firefox Latest

  • Brave Browser Team Up With Tor
     

    TOR [sic] or The Onion Router uses technology that separates your computer from the website you’re viewing by routing the network traffic through 3 seperate servers before it reaches your computer. That being said Brave Core Beta hasn’t been fully tested yet so “users should not rely on it for serious use just yet,” Brave said.

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  • Your RSS is grass: Mozilla euthanizes feed reader, Atom code in Firefox browser, claims it's old and unloved
    When Firefox 64 arrives in December, support for RSS, the once celebrated content syndication scheme, and its sibling, Atom, will be missing. "After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product," said Gijs Kruitbosch, a software engineer who works on Firefox at Mozilla, in a blog post on Thursday. RSS – which stands for Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary, or Really Simple Syndication, as you see fit – is an XML-based format for publishing and subscribing to web content feeds. It dates back to 1999 and for a time was rather popular, but been disappearing from a variety of applications and services since then. Mozilla appears to have gotten the wrecking ball rolling in 2011 when it removed the RSS button from Firefox. The explanation then was the same as it is now: It's just not very popular.
  • Cameron Kaiser: It's baaaaa-aaack: TenFourFox Intel
    It's back! It's undead! It's ugly! It's possibly functional! It's totally unsupported! It's ... TenFourFox for Intel Macs! Years ago as readers of this blog will recall, Claudio Leite built TenFourFox 17.0.2 for Intel, which the update check-in server shows some determined users are still running to this day on 10.5 and even 10.4 despite various problems such as issue 209. However, he didn't have time to maintain it, and a newer version was never built, though a few people since then have made various attempts and submitted some patches. One of these attempts is now far enough along to the point where I'm permitted to announce its existence. Riccardo Mottola has done substantial work on getting TenFourFox to build and run again on old Intel Macs with a focus on 32-bit compatibility, and his patches have been silently lurking in the source code repository for some time. Along with Ken Cunningham's additional work, who now also has a MacPorts portfile so you can build it yourself (PowerPC support in the portfile is coming, though you can still use the official instructions, of course), enough functions in the new Intel build that it can be used for basic tasks.

Security: 'Smart' Locks, Windows in Weapons

Android Leftovers