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Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Make Firefox Quantum look native in Fedora 27

    Client side decoration allows the application to use its own decorations. Traditionally the window manager is in charge of providing the title bar, close button, border, re-size grips, and so on. These graphical elements are called decorations. With client side decoration, an application can tell the window manager, “No thank you, I don’t want decorations.”

  • Red Hat Plans To Deploy Next-Gen Stratis Storage For Fedora 28

    Stratis is still at a pre-1.0 development stage and isn't expected to be feature complete at least well into 2018, but the hope is getting it early in Fedora will help mature it faster and see its community interest and adoption.

    More details on the Stratis Storage proposal for Fedora 28 can be found on the Fedora Wiki. More details on the Stratis project itself can be found via GitHub.

  • It’s time to modernize: Your UNIX alternative with Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Microsoft Azure

    A large Red Hat customer transitioned from a high-end RISC server to Red Hat Enterprise Linux on x86 and was able to recoup the cost of the project in just over three months. This is without factoring in real estate, depreciation of hardware, and power/cooling. In parallel, they were able to decrease their risk profile: according to one of Red Hat’s chief technologists who has advised many customers on their Linux migration strategy, spares for some RISC vendors have become increasingly difficult to acquire. Some customers readily admit that online auctions have become their primary source for spares. This is troubling on many levels. Factor in the price/performance ratio of RISC vs. x86 and the choice to migrate can become even more appealing.

  • Recent Institutional Activity: New York REIT, Inc. (NYRT), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Project Future Performance Before Investment – Red Hat, Inc., (NYSE: RHT)

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Adware

  • Mozilla Angers Firefox Users After Force-Installing Mr. Robot Promo Add-On
    Mozilla took a bit of heat this week after the organization force-installed a Mr. Robot promotional add-on in some Firefox browsers. The add-on, called Looking Glass, was intended to promote the season 3 finale of Mr. Robot that aired on Wednesday, December 13, but the whole media stunt failed miserably.
  • Firefox is on a slippery slope
    This extension was sideloaded into browsers via the “experiments” feature. Not only are these experiments enabled by default, but updates have been known to re-enable it if you turn it off. The advertisement addon shows up like this on your addon page, and was added to Firefox stable. If I saw this before I knew what was going on, I would think my browser was compromised! Apparently it was a mistake that this showed up on the addon page, though - it was supposed to be silently sideloaded into your browser! There’s a ticket on Bugzilla (Firefox’s bug tracker) for discussing this experiment, but it’s locked down and no one outside of Mozilla can see it. There’s another ticket, filed by concerned users, which has since been disabled and had many comments removed, particularly the angry (but respectful) ones.

Review: Daphile 17.09

Daphile is a minimal Linux distribution which is designed to be run on a computer dedicated to playing music. Daphile can be run on headless machines and its media controls are managed through a web-based interface. Basically, Daphile is intended to be run on a computer we can stick in the corner of a room and use it as a media centre without worrying about managing software, tweaking settings or navigating desktop environments. Daphile can be run from a CD or USB thumb drive for maximum portability and does not need to be installed directly on a hard drive to work. Daphile reportedly has the ability to rip audio CDs, play audio files from a local drive or stream music across network shares (Samba, NFS, FTP and OpenSSH services are supported). This gives us a pretty good range of media sources for our music collection. Under the hood, Daphile has its roots in Gentoo, though the operating system is somewhat stripped down and we cannot use Gentoo's package management utilities. Daphile runs the Busybox userland tools and a light web server, and very little else. In fact, Daphile does not provide a login interface to allow us to tinker with the operating system. The operating system is dedicated entirely to the task of playing music and our sole access to the media controls are through its web interface. The distribution is available in 32-bit and 64-bit builds and the ISO file we download for Daphile is 195MB in size. While Daphile is capable of running entirely without a screen, when we do boot from Daphile's media the distribution displays the distribution's IP address, which it obtains over DHCP. We can connect to the IP address using any modern web browser which automatically gives us access to Daphile's media controls, there is no user authentication built into the web interface. Read more

Android Leftovers

Linux Mint Releases Last KDE Edition "Sylvia"

​Mint fans rejoice as the latest version of Linux Mint 18.3 Sylvia with the KDE desktop is available to download on Linux Mint’s official website. The sad part is that this will be the last offering from Linux Mint that will feature the KDE desktop environment. Read
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