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Devices: Intel Boards, Tizen, and Android

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Android
  • Rugged Kaby Lake PC travels by road, rail, or the briny deep

    Axiomtek’s “tBOX500-510-FL” transportation PC has a Kaby Lake U-series CPU, 2x swappable SATA III bays, 3x mini-PCIe, modular I/O, and -40 to 70°C support.

    The tBOX500-510-FL is a scaled back version of Axiomtek’s similarly Intel Kaby Lake U-series based tBOX324-894-FL. Designed for vehicle, railway, and marine transportation applications, the tBOX500-510-FL runs Linux or Windows 10 on dual-core, 15W TDP Kaby Lake chips ranging from the Core i7-7600U (2.8GHz/3.9GHz) to a 2.2GHz Celeron 3965U.

  • Industrial NUC mini-PC run Kaby Lake U-series

    Logic Supply’s fanless, Ubuntu-friendly “ML100G-31” NUC mini-PC has a dual-core Kaby Lake SoC, M.2 wireless and SSD expansion, and 2x HDMI 2.0 ports.

    Logic Supply’s ML100G-31 is the fourth in its ML-1000 series of industrial-focused mini-PCs based on the Intel (Next Unit of Computing) reference design. The system follows the Intel Bay Trail based ML100G-10 and 5th Gen “Broadwell” based ML100G-30, both of which launched in 2015.

  • Developer – Tizen SCM Tools Release – 17.02.1
  • New VLC for Android Update Adds Picture-in-Picture Mode to Android Oreo Devices

    After more than a year of silence, VideoLAN recently updated the VLC for Android media player app with a lot of new stuff, numerous improvements, and much more.

    Coming more than a year after the VLC 2.0 release, VLC 2.5 has hit the Google Play Store over the weekend and it's a major update that adds support for 360-degree videos, a more dynamic and Material Design-compliant user interface, Picture-in-Picture mode for Android Oreo devices, as well as DayNight mode integration.

    VLC for Android is now integrated with Google Now and comes with a new Search activity, refactors the MediaLibrary, adds support for latest Chrome OS operating system with Android apps support, improves RTL (Right-to-Left) support, implements custom equalizer presets, and boosts audio in the video player.

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  • Google Releases Android 8.1 Oreo — Activates Pixel 2’s “Secret” Visual Core Chip

More in Tux Machines

Debian Development and News

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2018
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • PKCS#11 v2.20
    By way of experiment, I've just enabled the PKCS#11 v2.20 implementation in the eID packages for Linux, but for now only in the packages in the "continuous" repository. In the past, enabling this has caused issues; there have been a few cases where Firefox would deadlock when PKCS#11 v2.20 was enabled, rather than the (very old and outdated) v2.11 version that we support by default. We believe we have identified and fixed all outstanding issues that caused such deadlocks, but it's difficult to be sure.
  • Plans for DebCamp and DebConf 18
    I recently became an active contributor to the Debian project, which has been consolidated throughout my GSoC project. In addition to the great learning with my mentors, Lucas Kanashiro and Raphäel Hertzog, the feedback from other community members has been very valuable to the progress we are making in the Distro Tracker. Tomorrow, thanks to Debian project sponsorship, I will take off for Hsinchu, Taiwan to attend DebCamp and DebConf18. It is my first DebConf and I’m looking forward to meeting new people from the Debian community, learn a lot and make useful contributions during the time I am there.
  • Building Debian packages in CI (ick)
    I develop a number of (fairly small) programs, as a hobby. Some of them I also maintain as packages in Debian. All of them I publish as Debian packages in my own APT repository. I want to make the process for making a release of any of my programs as easy and automated as possible, and that includes building Debian packages and uploading them to my personal APT repository, and to Debian itself.
  • My DebCamp/DebConf 18 plans
    Tomorrow I am going to another DebCamp and DebConf; this time at Hsinchu, Taiwan.
  • Things you can do with Debian: multimedia editing
    The Debian operating system serves many purposes and you can do amazing things with it. Apart of powering the servers behind big internet sites like Wikipedia and others, you can use Debian in your PC or laptop. I’ve been doing that for many years. One of the great things you can do is some multimedia editing. It turns out I love nature, outdoor sports and adventures, and I usually take videos and photos with my friends while doing such activities. And when I arrive home I love editing them for my other blog, or putting them together in a video.

32-Bit Vs. 64-Bit Operating System

This has really been confusing to some people choosing between 32-bit and 64-bit systems. Head over to any operating system’s website, you will be given a choice to download either versions of the same operating system. So what is the difference? Why do we have two different versions of the same OS? Let us solve this mystery here, once and for all. Read more

Convert video using Handbrake

Recently, when my son asked me to digitally convert some old DVDs of his high school basketball games, I immediately knew I would use Handbrake. It is an open source package that has all the tools necessary to easily convert video into formats that can be played on MacOS, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, and other platforms. Handbrake is open source and distributable under the GPLv2 license. It's easy to install on MacOS, Windows, and Linux, including both Fedora and Ubuntu. In Linux, once it's installed, it can be launched from the command line with $ handbrake or selected from the graphical user interface. (In my case, that is GNOME 3.) Read more

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