Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Tip of the Trade: Nexenta

Filed under
OS

When Sun released Solaris under an open-source license and began distributing the binary edition free of cost, millions of users downloaded it. Some estimates claims as many as 10 million downloads so far. As nice as Solaris is, though, users accustomed to Linux or FreeBSD found it lacking in several key areas: system management and other useful utilities, a friendly interface and dependency-resolving installers. The cries of "oh, if only Solaris had the GNU toolchain, a friendly installer, all those thousands of great Linux applications, Linux's great hardware support, and Debian's aptitude, it would be perfect."

These cries did not go unheard, and thus the Nexenta project was born, thought with a slightly different perspective: "if only GNU/Linux had a better kernel."

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Latest Ubuntu Touch SDK Updates Focus on Convergence Features for OTA-6

On the last day of July 2015, Canonical's Zoltán Balogh posted an important email on the Ubuntu Touch mailing list, informing us all about the work done lately on the Ubuntu SDK (Software Development Kit) software. Read more

Wifislax 4.11.1 Linux Distro Arrives with Linux Kernel 4.1.3 LTS, Xfce 4.12.3

The developers of the popular Wifislax Linux distribution based on the well-known Slackware operating system and built around the KDE and Xfce desktop environments announced the release of Wifislax 4.11.1. Read more

5 Best Linux Desktop Environments With Pros & Cons


Picture

If you are new to Linux then I'm sure you are giving up lots of time choosing Desktop Environment of your Linux Distribution. You are probably thinking to give a try to each one of them but that's very time consuming. Edit - There are other good DEs also That's why I'm reviewing the 5 Best Linux Desktop Environments with the pros & cons. The article gives you what you should know for choosing a DE. So let's get started!

Redis open source DBMS overview

Redis runs on Linux. Although the Redis project doesn't directly support Windows, Microsoft Open Technologies develops and maintains a Windows port targeting Win64. The Redis open source DBMS is available as a BSD license. The Redis community offers support through the official mailing list as well as #redis on Freenode. Commercial support is available through Pivotal, the official sponsor of Redis. Pivotal offers two levels of professional support. Read more