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Software: Papis, Cozy, OpenShot, NeuVector, Latte Dock and More

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  • Papis – A Command-line Based Document And Bibliography Manager

    A while ago, we wrote about Mendeley – an academic social network for researchers and educators. Using Mendeley, the researchers, lecturers, educators and librarians can connect with each other, share data, discuss ideas about their research, follow inspirational researchers around the world, collaborate and lots more. Today, we are going to discuss yet another useful tool for research scholars. Meet Papis, a powerful and highly extensible command-line based document and bibliography manager. Unlike Mendeley, Papis is not just for a particular research community but for every one who wants to manage their documents easily and effectively. Also, you can retain the full ownership to your data, because all data will be stored in your local drive.

  • Linux Audiobook Player ‘Cozy’ Adds Sleep Timer, m4a Support

    Cozy, the open-source audiobook player for Linux desktop, has a new version out. The app adds a sleep timer and improves the interface.

  • OpenShot 2.4.1 Released with Various Improvements

    A new version of the OpenShot video editor is available to download.

    OpenShot 2.4.1 follows a stability-focused release of the non-linear editor made back in September.

    Among the big changes OpenShot 2.4.1 features is improved image quality. You should now see sharper images in the preview window when editing thanks to an “improved image processing pipeline”.

    There’s also improved playback smoothness when working with high frame-rate videos at 50fps, 60fps, and 120fps.

  • NeuVector 1.3 Boosts Container Security with Improved Threat Detection

    Security startup NeuVector announced version 1.3 of its container security platform on Nov.13, providing advanced capabilities to help organizations detect threats that can be hidden in container workloads.

    NeuVector's platform provides a container firewall that can filter application layer traffic to help identify anomalous behavior and traffic. Among the new features in the NeuVector 1.3 release, is the ability to get visibility into tunnelled traffic, as well as advanced privilege escalation detection capabilities. NeuVector is also expanding its portfolio with an enhanced enterprise edition that provides additional capabilities.

  • Latte Dock v0.7.2 arrives in KDE and Kubuntu backports PPA

    Latte Dock, the very popular doc/panel app for Plasma Desktop, has released its new bugfix version 0.7.2. This is also the first stable release since Latte Dock became an official KDE project at the end of August.

  • Latte bug fix release v0.7.2

    Latte Dock v0.7.2 has been released containing many important fixes and improvements!

  • Interview with Lars Pontoppidan

    I’d like to thank everyone involved with Krita for making this great open source and free software available to the world. I hope to soon get enough time on my hands to help the project grow.

  • GNOME Shell 4 Proposal Published To Be More Wayland-Focused

    Jonas Adahl of Red Hat has volleyed his initial proposals for how a "future" GNOME Shell could be architected on a page entitled GNOME Shell 4. This GNOME Shell 4 would potentially break compatibility with GNOME Shell 3 extensions while being more designed around Wayland rather than X11.

    GNOME Shell 3 started out as an X11 compositing manager and has then been fitted for Wayland and other modern input/display features on Linux. With GNOME Shell 4, it would be more of a Wayland-first design and perhaps we could see it do away with X11/X.Org support entirely.

    The new GNOME Shell would be better fitted for low-latency input forwarding, low-latency visual input event feedback (namely pointer cursors), low-latency/zero-copy client forwarding, input methods within the shell UI, and eliminating stalls on the main compositor thread during frame redraws.

More in Tux Machines

Themes With Emphasis on GTK/GNOME

  • Stylish Gtk Themes Makes Your Linux Desktop Look Stylish
    There are plenty of nice themes available for Gnome desktop and many of them are in active development. Stylish theme pack is one of the great looking pack around since 2014 and constantly evolving. It offers stylish clean and flat design themes for Gtk-3 and Gtk-2, including Gnome shell themes. Stylish theme pack is based Materia theme and support almost every desktop environment such as Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce, Mate, Budgie, Panteon, etc. We are offering Stylish themes via our PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint. If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint then download this pack directly from its page and install it in this location "~/.themes" or "/usr/share/themes". Since Stylish theme pack is in active development that means if you encounter any kind of bug or issue with it then report it to get fixed in the next update.
  • Delft: Another Great Icon Pack In Town Forked From Faenza Icons
    In past, you may have used Faenza icon theme or you still have it set on your desktop. Delft icons are revived version of Faenza and forked from Faenza icon theme, maybe it is not right to say 'revived' because it looks little different from Faenza theme and at the same time it stays close to the original Faenza icons, it is released under license GNU General Public License V3. The theme was named after a dutch city, which is known for its history, its beauty, and Faenza in Italy. The author who is maintaining Delft icons saw that Faenza icons haven't been updated from some years and thought to carry this project. There are some icons adopted from the Obsidian icon theme. Delft icon pack offer many variants (Delft, Delft-Amber, Delft-Aqua, Delft-Blue, Delft-Dark, Delft-Gray, Delft-Green, Delft-Mint, Delft-Purple, Delft-Red, Delft-Teal) including light and dark versions for light/dark themes, you can choose appropriate one according to your desktop theme. These icons are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Lxde, Xfce and others. Many application icons available in this icons pack and if you find any missing icon or want to include something in this icon pack or face any kind of bug then report it to creator.
  • Give Your Desktop A Sweet Outlook With Sweet Themes Give Your Desktop A Sweet Outlook With Sweet Themes
    It is feels bit difficult to describe this theme we are going to introduce here today. Sweet theme pack looks and feel very different on the desktop but at the same time make the Linux desktop elegant and eye catching. Maybe these are not perfect looking themes available but it lineup in the perfect theme queue. You may say, I don't like it in screenshots, let me tell you that you should install it on your system and if you don't like then you already have option to remove it. So there is no harm to try a new thing, maybe this is next best theme pack for your Linux desktop.

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Open-source hardware could defend against the next generation of hacking

Imagine you had a secret document you had to store away from prying eyes. And you have a choice: You could buy a safe made by a company that kept the workings of its locks secret. Or you could buy a safe whose manufacturer openly published the designs, letting everyone – including thieves – see how they’re made. Which would you choose? It might seem unexpected, but as an engineering professor, I’d pick the second option. The first one might be safe – but I simply don’t know. I’d have to take the company’s word for it. Maybe it’s a reputable company with a longstanding pedigree of quality, but I’d be betting my information’s security on the company upholding its traditions. By contrast, I can judge the security of the second safe for myself – or ask an expert to evaluate it. I’ll be better informed about how secure my safe is, and therefore more confident that my document is safe inside it. That’s the value of open-source technology. Read more