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Server: Containers, ARM Servers, and China's HPC Lead

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Server
  • OCI Update: v1.0.1 Release and New Maintainer

    The OCI community continues to be hard at work, having just issued the first update to OCI v.1.0, after five months of focusing on stability. OCI 1.0.1 contains updates to both the image format and runtime specifications.

    We’re still growing and expanding, with even more collaboration since the launch of v 1.0. For example, we are now up to over 5,000 commits from 184 authors across 42 different organizations. Organizations like AWS, Docker, Cloud Foundry, CoreOS, Intel, Mesosphere, Oracle, Red Hat and Kubernetes have already taken advantage of the OCI v1.0 specifications, and with v1.0.1 now available, the industry is on the precipice of true portability and standardization. We had a strong showing on site at recent industry events, at both DockerCon Europe in Copenhagen and Open Source Summit Europe in Prague.

  • How enterprise IT uses Kubernetes to tame container complexity

    Running a few standalone containers for development purposes won’t rob your IT team of time or patience: A standards-based container runtime by itself will do the job. But once you scale to a production environment and multiple applications spanning many containers, it’s clear that you need a way to coordinate those containers to deliver the individual services. As containers accumulate, complexity grows. Eventually, you need to take a step back and group containers along with the coordinated services they need, such as networking, security, and telemetry.

    That’s why technologies like the open source Kubernetes project are such a big part of the container scene.

  • ARM emulator in a VM? Yup, done. Ready to roll, no config required

    Hacking low-level code on ARM processors just became a little easier after a researcher who operates under the name Azeria Labs put together virtual machines that emulate common hardware.

  • AMD Rolls Out ROCm 1.7 Platform For Supercomputing 17

    AMD has unveiled the Radeon Open Compute platform (ROCm) 1.7 release as part of their wares at this week's Supercomputing 17 (SC17) conference in Denver.

    The ROCm 1.7 update introduces multi-GPU support for "the latest Radeon GPU hardware" (presumably referring to Vega) while also supporting TensorFlow and Caffe via AMD's MIOpen libraries.

  • Red Hat introduces Arm server support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM64
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM Hits General Availability

    Red Hat now considers their ARM support on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL7) to be supported under general availability "GA" terms.

  • Orange and Red Hat push open source NFVi development

    At the OpenStack Summit 2017, operator Orange has joined forces with equally colourful open-source software vendor Red Hat to promote NFVi innovation.

    Sadly the two companies have missed a trick by declining to name their mutual endeavour Orange Hat, but we mustn’t let that detract from the underlying cleverness. Orange seems to reckon network functions virtualization infrastructure is best done in the open-source environment and Red Hat unsurprisingly agrees.

  • China Pulls Ahead of U.S. in Latest TOP500 List

    The fiftieth TOP500 list of the fastest supercomputers in the world has China overtaking the US in the total number of ranked systems by a margin of 202 to 143. It is the largest number of supercomputers China has ever claimed on the TOP500 ranking, with the US presence shrinking to its lowest level since the list’s inception 25 years ago.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux 4.15, Linux 4.16, and Linux Foundation's CNCF and CII

  • Linux 4.15 Gets Fixed To Report Current CPU Frequency Via /proc/cpuinfo
    A change recently in the Linux kernel led the CPU MHz reported value via /proc/cpuinfo to either be the nominal CPU frequency or the most recently requested frequency. This behavior changed compared to pre-4.13 kernels while now it's been fixed up to report the current CPU frequency.
  • Linux 4.16 Will Be Another Big Cycle For Intel's DRM Driver
    We are just through week one of two for the Linux 4.15 merge window followed by eight or so weeks after that before this next kernel is officially released. But Intel's open-source driver developers have already begun building up a growing stack of changes for Linux 4.16 when it comes to their DRM graphics driver.
  • CNCF Wants You to Use 'Certified Kubernetes'
  • Open Source Threat Modeling
    Application threat modeling is a structured approach to identifying ways that an adversary might try to attack an application and then designing mitigations to prevent, detect or reduce the impact of those attacks. The description of an application’s threat model is identified as one of the criteria for the Linux CII Best Practises Silver badge.

Linux World Domination and Microsoft Corruption in Munich

Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING

  • 5 DevOps leadership priorities in 2018
    This week, DevOps professionals gathered in San Francisco to talk about the state of DevOps in the enterprise. At 1,400 attendees, the sold-out DevOps Enterprise Summit has doubled in size since 2014 – a testament to the growth of the DevOps movement itself. With an ear to this event and an eye on the explosion of tweets coming out of it, here are five key priorities we think IT leaders should be aware of as they take their DevOps efforts into the new year.
  • NumPy Plan for dropping Python 2.7 support
    The Python core team plans to stop supporting Python 2 in 2020. The NumPy project has supported both Python 2 and Python 3 in parallel since 2010, and has found that supporting Python 2 is an increasing burden on our limited resources; thus, we plan to eventually drop Python 2 support as well. Now that we're entering the final years of community-supported Python 2, the NumPy project wants to clarify our plans, with the goal of to helping our downstream ecosystem make plans and accomplish the transition with as little disruption as possible.
  • Google SLING: An Open Source Natural Language Parser
    Google Research has just released an open source project that might be of interest if you are into natural language processing. SLING is a combination of recurrent neural networks and frame based parsing. Natural language parsing is an important topic. You can get meaning from structure and parsing is how you get structure. It is important in processing both text and voice. If you have any hope that Siri, Cortana or Alexa are going to get any better then you need to have better natural language understanding - not just the slot and filler systems currently in use.