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Server: Containers, ARM Servers, and China's HPC Lead

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  • OCI Update: v1.0.1 Release and New Maintainer

    The OCI community continues to be hard at work, having just issued the first update to OCI v.1.0, after five months of focusing on stability. OCI 1.0.1 contains updates to both the image format and runtime specifications.

    We’re still growing and expanding, with even more collaboration since the launch of v 1.0. For example, we are now up to over 5,000 commits from 184 authors across 42 different organizations. Organizations like AWS, Docker, Cloud Foundry, CoreOS, Intel, Mesosphere, Oracle, Red Hat and Kubernetes have already taken advantage of the OCI v1.0 specifications, and with v1.0.1 now available, the industry is on the precipice of true portability and standardization. We had a strong showing on site at recent industry events, at both DockerCon Europe in Copenhagen and Open Source Summit Europe in Prague.

  • How enterprise IT uses Kubernetes to tame container complexity

    Running a few standalone containers for development purposes won’t rob your IT team of time or patience: A standards-based container runtime by itself will do the job. But once you scale to a production environment and multiple applications spanning many containers, it’s clear that you need a way to coordinate those containers to deliver the individual services. As containers accumulate, complexity grows. Eventually, you need to take a step back and group containers along with the coordinated services they need, such as networking, security, and telemetry.

    That’s why technologies like the open source Kubernetes project are such a big part of the container scene.

  • ARM emulator in a VM? Yup, done. Ready to roll, no config required

    Hacking low-level code on ARM processors just became a little easier after a researcher who operates under the name Azeria Labs put together virtual machines that emulate common hardware.

  • AMD Rolls Out ROCm 1.7 Platform For Supercomputing 17

    AMD has unveiled the Radeon Open Compute platform (ROCm) 1.7 release as part of their wares at this week's Supercomputing 17 (SC17) conference in Denver.

    The ROCm 1.7 update introduces multi-GPU support for "the latest Radeon GPU hardware" (presumably referring to Vega) while also supporting TensorFlow and Caffe via AMD's MIOpen libraries.

  • Red Hat introduces Arm server support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM64
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM Hits General Availability

    Red Hat now considers their ARM support on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL7) to be supported under general availability "GA" terms.

  • Orange and Red Hat push open source NFVi development

    At the OpenStack Summit 2017, operator Orange has joined forces with equally colourful open-source software vendor Red Hat to promote NFVi innovation.

    Sadly the two companies have missed a trick by declining to name their mutual endeavour Orange Hat, but we mustn’t let that detract from the underlying cleverness. Orange seems to reckon network functions virtualization infrastructure is best done in the open-source environment and Red Hat unsurprisingly agrees.

  • China Pulls Ahead of U.S. in Latest TOP500 List

    The fiftieth TOP500 list of the fastest supercomputers in the world has China overtaking the US in the total number of ranked systems by a margin of 202 to 143. It is the largest number of supercomputers China has ever claimed on the TOP500 ranking, with the US presence shrinking to its lowest level since the list’s inception 25 years ago.

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