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KDE: KDE Promo, KTextEditor, Redshift Plasmoid

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KDE
  • KDE Promo Activity Report – October 2017

    Another week, another KDE Promo report!

    This edition of the report is special in that we’ve now synchronized the reports posted on the mailing list with the ones posted here. In other words, the posts shared here will no longer lag behind the mailing list.

    If you missed the previous report, don’t worry: you can read it here.

    So, what have we been up to in the past month, and which tasks do we offer to potential contributors?
    Let’s have a look.

  • KTextEditorPreviewPlugin 0.2.1 (last stand-alone)

    The KTextEditorPreviewPlugin software provides the KTextEditor Document Preview Plugin, a plugin for the editor Kate, the IDE KDevelop, or other software using the KTextEditor framework.

    The plugin enables a live preview of the currently edited text document in the final format, in the sidebar (Kate) or as tool view (KDevelop). So when editing e.g. a Markdown text or an SVG image, the result is instantly visible next to the source text. For the display the plugin uses that KParts plugin which is currently selected as the preferred one for the MIME type of the document. If there is no KParts plugin for that type, no preview is possible.

  • Clive Johnston: Trouble sleeping? Try the Redshift Plasmoid

    Recently I have been having trouble sleeping and looked into ways to help myself drift off to the land of nod a bit more easily.

    One technique, which I have on my mobile phone, is to reduce blue colours with a shift to more subtle warmer red colours. This is called “redshift” and I decided to see if the feature is available in KDE Plasma. It turns out that there is a Plasmoid made for this task called “Redshift Control” and it is available via the Ubuntu archive.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Patches

  • Ubuntu Preparing Kernel Updates With IBRS/IBPB For Spectre Mitigation
    Canonical has rolled out Spectre Variant One and Spectre Variant Two mitigation to their proposed repository with updated kernels for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS / 16.04 LTS / 17.10. These kernels with IBRS and IBPB added in will be sent down as stable release updates next week.
  • Canonical Invites Ubuntu Users to Test Kernel Patches for Spectre Security Flaw
    Canonical has released preliminary kernel updates to mitigate both variants of the Spectre security vulnerability in all supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, including all official flavors. The company promised last week that it would release new kernel updates on Monday, January 15, 2018, for all supported Ubuntu releases. But it didn't happen as they needed more time to thoroughly test and prepare the patches that would presumably address variant 1 and 2 of the Spectre exploit, which is harder to fix than Meltdown, so that it won't cause any issues.
  • Purism Progress Report, Spectre Mitigation for Ubuntu, Malicious Chrome Extensions and More
    Canonical has made Spectre Variant One and Spectre Variant Two mitigation availble in Ubuntu Proposed with updated kernels for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, 16.04 LTS and 17.10. Those kernels will be in the stable release updates starting January 22, 2018. See ubuntu insights for more information.

Canonical Wants to Stick to Older Nautilus for Desktop Icons in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

As you may be aware, upstream GNOME team decided to remove the handling of desktop icons from the Nautilus file manager, moving it to the GNOME Shell user interface through an extension. The change will take effect with the upcoming GNOME 3.28 desktop environment, due for release on March 14, 2018. Now that Ubuntu switched to GNOME as default desktop environment, the change will affect all upcoming releases of the operating system, starting with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), which is currently under heavy development. Read more

CentOS Linux 7 and 6 Users Receive New Microcode Updates for Intel and AMD CPUs

CentOS Linux is an open-source, free, enterprise-class, and community-supported operating system based on and compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux. As such, it regularly receives new important security updates as soon as they are released upstream by Red Hat. About two weeks ago, CentOS Linux 7 and 6 users received kernel and microcode updates that mitigated the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities unearthed earlier this month. However, after some thorough testing, Red Hat discovered that these updated microcode firmware developed by Intel and AMD caused hardware issues. Read more

Google moves to Debian for in-house Linux desktop

Google has officially confirmed the company is shifting its in-house Linux desktop from the Ubuntu-based Goobuntu to a new Linux distro, the DebianTesting-based gLinux. Margarita Manterola, a Google Engineer, quietly announced Google would move from Ubuntu to Debian-testing for its desktop Linux at DebConf17 in a lightning talk. Manterola explained that Google was moving to gLinux, a rolling release based on Debian Testing. Read more