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Lara Croft gets a breast reduction

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Gaming

Videogame idol Lara Croft has been given a smaller bust as part of a makeover gaming company Eidos hopes revives the once-hot tomb-raiding heroine.

"Tomb Raider" debuted in 1996 to rave reviews, spawning magazine covers and movies. However, the last version in the franchise, "Angel of Darkness," was criticized for being virtually unplayable.

London-based game maker Eidos said everything in "Lara Croft Tomb Raider: Legend" is new -- including a fresh code-writing team who worked with original creator Toby Gard.

The new Lara Croft`s bust size also has been reduced.

"With Angel of Darkness, we strayed," Eidos Global Brand Manager Matt Gorman told the BBC. "We took Lara out of her context, out of the tombs."

Eidos showed off the new game recently in Los Angeles, but would not let anyone play it to see how well it works.

"Lara Croft Tomb Raider: Legend" is due for fall release in a number of formats.

United Press International

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