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Linux 4.14-rc5 Released

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Linux

Linus Torvalds has just issued the Linux 4.14-rc5 kernel update.

With this release out today, we're three to four weeks out from seeing the official Linux 4.14 kernel release. Linux 4.14 has overall been a big cycle with the possibility of going up to a Linux 4.14-rc8 test release prior to declaring the stable release, but we'll have to see Torvalds' reactions in the weeks ahead.

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Official mail

  • Linux 4.14-rc5

    Things seem to be finally starting to calm down for 4.14.

    We've certainly had smaller rc5's, but we've had bigger ones too, and
    this week finally felt fairly normal in a release that has up until
    now felt a bit messier than it perhaps should have been.

    So assuming this trend holds, we're all good. Knock wood.

    So what do we have here? A little bit of everything, but what might be
    most noticeable is some more fixes for the whole new x86 TLB handling
    due to the ASID changes that came in this release. Some of the lazy
    TLB handling changes caused problems on a few AMD chips with
    particular settings, because it was all a little bit *too* lazy in
    flushing the TLB. Even when TLB entries aren't used (and will be
    flushed before any possible use), the TLB may be speculatively filled,
    and that can cause problems if we've already free'd the page tables
    that the speculative fill ends up looking up.

    The other thing perhaps worth mentioning is how much random fuzzing
    people are doing, and it's finding things. We've always done fuzzing
    (who remembers the old "crashme" program that just generated random
    code and jumped to it? We used to do that quite actively very early
    on), but people have been doing some nice targeted fuzzing of driver
    subsystems etc, and there's been various fixes (not just this last
    week either) coming out of those efforts. Very nice to see.

    Anyway, rc5 is out, and things look normal. We've got arch updates
    (mostly x86and poweerpc, but some mips), drivers (gpu, networking,
    usb, sound, misc), some core kernel (lockdep fixes, networking, mm)
    and some tooling (perf, selftests).

    Go out and test,

    Linus

  • Kernel prepatch 4.14-rc5

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