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Ten reasons Linux and BSD are vastly superior to Windows

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Linux
BSD

I know that some Microsoft fanboys are probably hitting the Send button on their flames as they read the title, but you can't ignore the truth. Linux and BSD are vastly superior to Windows in every way. Don't believe me? Read on, my friend. Read on and realize the folly of your MS ways.

The top ten list
#10 - Total cost of ownership ranges very low to nothing for Linux.
For that matter, ownership isn't really a term you can apply to your Windows box. Microsoft allows you to use their software, for a hefty fee, and you are limited as to how you can use your software and what machines you can install it on. Want to install a new CPU in your Windows box? Sorry, you'll have to "activate" your copy of Windows again. Want to actually be productive with Windows right out of the box? Sorry, it doesn't come with any software, unless you count Notepad and Solitare. But that's another point entirely...

You can freely download Linux from thousands of different websites. If you don't have a fast internet connection, you can also purchase it for a very, very small fee - usually not much more than the cost of the CD's themselves plus shipping. Even if you purchase a full retail version of a major Linux distro, say Novell's Suse or Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation, you're still far short of the cost of Windows plus the cost of all the software you'll still have to purchase to bring Windows up to the basic usability level as your average Linux distribution.

Bottom line: If you are only considering cost - Linux and BSD will always be cheaper than Windows in every scenario. Game over. Windows cannot compete in cost.

#9 - Linux and BSD distributions give you more complete, usable operating environments out of the box.

Full Story.

re: Ten reasons

Blah blah blah.

Another clueless writer that has NO concept of how tech works in the real world (plus it'd be nice if his rants were even somewhat accurate - but they're not).

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