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Servers: Containers, Buzzwords, and Debian

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Server
  • Using Containers? Look for the OCI Seal of Approval

    Some standards have been set for container technology. That's a good thing. Without standards, everybody working on developing a technology goes in separate directions, with no thought about how their implementation will work and play with the work being done by others. Without standards, vendor lock-in is practically unavoidable.

    Until July, when the Open Container Initiative (OCI) released version 1.0 of its specification, there were no standards when it came to containers. Products from one vendor didn't necessarily work with the offerings from another. Obviously, this was a problem for DevOps working in diverse environments.

  • 6 ways to work with database admins in the DevOps world

    DevOps is defined as "unifying the operations and engineering teams," in order to foster a culture of cross-team collaboration, codify how infrastructure is built, and become a more data-driven organization. But it seems databases and the teams that care for them are treated as an exception to this environment. In most companies, databases are still treated like walled gardens, with the database hosts tended to like delicate flowers and the database administrators (DBAs) guarding any and all access to them.

    This walled-garden attitude invariably affects the rest of the organization, from tech ops, to delivery engineering, all the way to product planning, as everyone tries to work around the datastore. Ultimately this reduces the benefits of an agile approach to software development, which is a problem for companies that have been running for a few years and have reached a solid financial footing with loyal paying customers, but are having a hard time shedding that startup skin (the one that flies by the seat of its pants), and are feeling the pressure to achieve a sense of stability in existing and future offerings.

  • Container Runtime Brings Greater Flexibility to Kubernetes and BOSH

    The Cloud Foundry Foundation on Wednesday launched Cloud Foundry Container Runtime, or CFCR, as the default deployment and management platform for containers using Kubernetes and BOSH.

  • Debian and the GDPR

    GDPR is a new EU regulation for privacy. The name is short for "General Data Protection Regulation" and it covers all organisations that handle personal data of EU citizens and EU residents. It will become enforceable May 25, 2018 (Towel Day). This will affect Debian. I think it's time for Debian to start working on compliance, mainly because the GDPR requires sensible things.

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Amiga Enthusiast Gets Quake Running On Killer NIC PowerPC CPU Core

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New Devices With Defective Intel Chips and Linux Support

  • Linux-friendly embedded computer runs on Apollo Lake power
    Axiomtek has released a rugged, Ubuntu-ready “eBOX627-312-FL” embedded PC with a dual-core Celeron N3350, 2x GbE, 6x USB, and 4x serial ports plus mini-PCIe, HDMI, SATA, and “Flexible I/O.”
  • EPIC board boasts 4x GbE ports and PCIe x4
    Aaeon is rolling out a new EPIC form-factor “EPIC-KBS9” SBC with 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series chips, 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR3, and mini-PCIe and PCIe x4 expansion. Aaeon’s EPIC-KBS9 follows two other EPIC-KBS SBCs to support Intel’s 6th “Skylake” or 7th “Kaby Lake” generation S-Series processors: the EPIC-KBS7, which emphasized real-world ports, and last month’s EPIC-KBS8, which is a bit more feature rich but with fewer coastline ports. Unlike these earlier models, the KBS9 offers 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR4-2133, and a full-size PCIe x4 slot, which supports NVMe storage.

'Foreshadow' Coverage