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today's leftovers

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  • Alpha outs Centurion Nano/Ultra Linux laptops

    If you’re looking for a slim notebook and acknowledge the superiority of Linux over Windows, you could be interested in the two new Alpha laptops that come pre-installed with a Linux-based OS. The Centurion Nano and Centurion Ultra notebooks are powered by gen 7 ULV CPUs from Intel and feature stylish slim silver aluminum cases.

  • Ditching Windows for Linux led to 'major difficulties' says open-source champion Munich [Ed: This is FUD. Munich is not replacing GNU/Linux. At least not yet. Microsoft needs Munich to fail or be perceived as failing by all means possible. This is why.]
  • Administering Chromebooks : For teams traveling to complex and hostile environments

    If you are traveling to hostile or complex environments the phrase “use a Chromebook” has become the “use Signal, use Tor” of border crossing device security. Nearly all of the individuals who work in these environments knows that, as with everything, it’s more complex than that.

  • Red Hat channel head talking to partner base about the wider opportunity

    The recently appointed UK channel head at Red Hat is keen to talk to existing partners about the benefits of selling the firm's wider portfolio

  • Red Hat unveils new containerised storage solution

    Open source solutions provider Red Hat has unveiled its new Container-Native Storage solution, which now supports containerised applications and infrastructure in Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform clusters.

    The company says providing a platform for versatile storage for containers will enable customers to manage, scale, and upgrade their storage needs using a single control plane, allowing for greater storage efficiency and cost savings.

  • Bodhi 2.12.1 released
  • Announce: Entangle “Lithium“ release 1.0 – an app for tethered camera control & capture
  • Mir 1.0 Is Pulled Back, Now It's Mir 0.28

    While we've long been told that Mir 1.0 would happen for Ubuntu 17.10 -- even as recently as last month -- and then earlier this week was a Mir 1.0 tag and the v1.0.0 milestone in Launchpad, that version is being pulled back in favor of calling it Mir 0.28.

    Even following the decision to drop the grand Unity 8 + Mir plans, Mir 1.0 was still a target for the "Artful Aardvark" and their revised plan around the remaining Mir developers has been adding Wayland client support. That initial Wayland client support in Mir is in place albeit still fairly basic but should get better over time. We haven't seen Mir Vulkan support or other previously talked about changes for Mir 1.0, including the dropping of their old APIs, etc.

  • Arch Vs. Linux Mint

    If there’s ever been a mismatch in comparing any two distros, it definitely does not get any better as a mismatch than this. While Linux Mint seeks to provide an all-around distro that is ready for work and play right out of the box with a carefully curated software selection and experience, Arch allows advanced users to custom design their own distro with only the packages and software they’d want. So how do these two distros compare, their similarities and differences?​

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Games Chronicon, BROKE PROTOCOL, Internet Archive

  • 2D action RPG 'Chronicon' to arrive on Linux with the next big update
    The colourful action RPG Chronicon [Steam, Official Site] should arrive on Linux with the next big update, the developer has said.
  • BROKE PROTOCOL is like a low-poly GTA Online and it's coming to Linux
    BROKE PROTOCOL [Steam], a low-poly open-world action game that's a little like GTA Online and it's coming to Linux.
  • The Internet Archive Just Uploaded a Bunch of Playable, Classic Handheld Games
    The non-profit Internet Archive is perhaps best known for its Wayback Machine that takes snap shots of web sites so you can see what they looked like in the past. However, it also has a robust side project where it emulates and uploads old, outdated games that aren’t being maintained anymore. Recently, the organization added a slew of a unique kind of game that’s passed into memory: handheld LCD electronic games. The games–like Mortal Kombat, depicted above–used special LCD screens with preset patterns. They could only display the exact images in the exact place that they were specified for. This meant the graphics were incredibly limited and each unit could only play the one game it was designed to play. A Game Boy, this was not.
  • Internet Archive emulator brings dozens of handheld games back from obscurity
    Over the weekend, the Internet Archive announced it was offering a new series of emulators. This time, they’re designed to mimic one of gaming’s most obscure artifacts — handheld games. When I say a “handheld game,” I don’t mean the Game Boy or the PSP — those are handheld consoles. These are single-game handheld or tabletop devices that look and feel more like toys. The collection includes the very old, mostly-forgotten games sold in mini-handhelds from the 80s onward.

Linux Foundation Videos and Projects

LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, this weekend at MIT, March 24-25

This weekend, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) present the tenth annual LibrePlanet free software conference in Cambridge, March 24-25, 2018, at MIT. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature sessions for all ages and experience levels. LibrePlanet's tenth anniversary theme is "Freedom Embedded." Embedded systems are everywhere, in cars, digital watches, traffic lights, and even within our bodies. We've come to expect that proprietary software's sinister aspects are embedded in software, digital devices, and our lives, too: we expect that our phones monitor our activity and share that data with big companies, that governments enforce digital restrictions management (DRM), and that even our activity on social Web sites is out of our control. This year's talks and workshops will explore how to defend user freedom in a society reliant on embedded systems. Read more Also: FSF Blogs: Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: March 23rd starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC