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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Alpha outs Centurion Nano/Ultra Linux laptops

    If you’re looking for a slim notebook and acknowledge the superiority of Linux over Windows, you could be interested in the two new Alpha laptops that come pre-installed with a Linux-based OS. The Centurion Nano and Centurion Ultra notebooks are powered by gen 7 ULV CPUs from Intel and feature stylish slim silver aluminum cases.

  • Ditching Windows for Linux led to 'major difficulties' says open-source champion Munich [Ed: This is FUD. Munich is not replacing GNU/Linux. At least not yet. Microsoft needs Munich to fail or be perceived as failing by all means possible. This is why.]
  • Administering Chromebooks : For teams traveling to complex and hostile environments

    If you are traveling to hostile or complex environments the phrase “use a Chromebook” has become the “use Signal, use Tor” of border crossing device security. Nearly all of the individuals who work in these environments knows that, as with everything, it’s more complex than that.

  • Red Hat channel head talking to partner base about the wider opportunity

    The recently appointed UK channel head at Red Hat is keen to talk to existing partners about the benefits of selling the firm's wider portfolio

  • Red Hat unveils new containerised storage solution

    Open source solutions provider Red Hat has unveiled its new Container-Native Storage solution, which now supports containerised applications and infrastructure in Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform clusters.

    The company says providing a platform for versatile storage for containers will enable customers to manage, scale, and upgrade their storage needs using a single control plane, allowing for greater storage efficiency and cost savings.

  • Bodhi 2.12.1 released
  • Announce: Entangle “Lithium“ release 1.0 – an app for tethered camera control & capture
  • Mir 1.0 Is Pulled Back, Now It's Mir 0.28

    While we've long been told that Mir 1.0 would happen for Ubuntu 17.10 -- even as recently as last month -- and then earlier this week was a Mir 1.0 tag and the v1.0.0 milestone in Launchpad, that version is being pulled back in favor of calling it Mir 0.28.

    Even following the decision to drop the grand Unity 8 + Mir plans, Mir 1.0 was still a target for the "Artful Aardvark" and their revised plan around the remaining Mir developers has been adding Wayland client support. That initial Wayland client support in Mir is in place albeit still fairly basic but should get better over time. We haven't seen Mir Vulkan support or other previously talked about changes for Mir 1.0, including the dropping of their old APIs, etc.

  • Arch Vs. Linux Mint

    If there’s ever been a mismatch in comparing any two distros, it definitely does not get any better as a mismatch than this. While Linux Mint seeks to provide an all-around distro that is ready for work and play right out of the box with a carefully curated software selection and experience, Arch allows advanced users to custom design their own distro with only the packages and software they’d want. So how do these two distros compare, their similarities and differences?​

More in Tux Machines

Solus Gets Driverless Printing, Improvements to Linux Steam Integration, More

Solus' communications manager Joshua Strobl is reporting today on the latest goodies and software updates that landed recently in the software repositories of the Linux-based operating system. Read more

Canonical Adds Last-Minute Finishing Touches to Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark)

Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche shares today with the community some of the last minute finishing touches that he and the Ubuntu Desktop team had to add to the forthcoming Ubuntu 17.10 release. Read more

Today in Techrights

OSS Leftovers

  • 20 Most Promising Open Source Solution Providers - 2017
    Open source has become an imperative part of every developer’s arsenal. The potential to gather assistance from the community and the capacity to link into a range of systems and solutions make open source incredibly powerful. As open source software becomes ubiquitous, and used by the vast majority of enterprises throughout the world, 2017 is all set for vendors of application delivery controller (ADC) to start providing improved and tighter integration packages for various open source projects, especially surrounding ADC-generated telemetry. Companies have been extensively using their analytics and machine learning capabilities for quite some time to identify actionable patterns from the collected data. With the rising demand for business intelligence, this year is foreseen to be the year of information superiority with businesses, leveraging data as a key differentiator. In the past couple of years, containers have been emerging as an imminent trend. As the business focus starkly shifts on rightsizing of resources, containers are expected to become a common phenomenon, giving businesses the ability to leverage highly portable assets and make the move into micro services much simpler. Adjacently, automation has become essential now. Mostly intensified by DevOps adoption, the automation of software delivery and infrastructure changes have freed developers to spend more time creating and less time worrying about infrastructure.
  • DevOps pros and open source: Culturally connected
    Like chocolate and peanut butter, DevOps and open source are two great tastes that taste great together. For many DevOps pros, it's the perfect cultural and technical match.
  • Interoperability: A Case For Open Source - GC@PCI Commentary
    He continues: “An open source model allows companies to see the assumptions behind the calculation and lowers the cost of entry into the cat modeling business. More importantly, the standardized and interoperable hazard, vulnerability and financial modules included in a true open source model facilitate the collaboration of data from insurers, reinsurers, entrepreneurs, scientists, computer programmers and individuals, all of which may result in a new generation of cat models.”
  • DevOps Skills Are Key to Collaboration within Organizations
    DevOps is one of the most highly sought skills employers are seeking to fill among 57 percent of respondents in the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report, from Dice and The Linux Foundation. Specifically, firms are looking for developers (73 percent) and DevOps engineers (60 percent).
  • Projects You Can Help With For Advancing Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Graphics
    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst has been working on an updated list of project ideas for new contributors or those that may be wanting to participate in an Endless Vacation of Code / Google Summer of Code.
  • Join The Linux Foundation at Open Source Summit EU for Booth Swag, Project Updates, and More
    Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.
  • Oracle Promises To Open Source Oracle JDK And Improve Java EE
    Oracle had already announced it would be moving Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, and the announcements at JavaOne move the language further to a more vendor-neutral future. It's worth noting that the keynote was preceded by a Safe Harbor disclaimer in which Oracle said it could not be held to plans made during the speech, so nothing is actually certain.
  • Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement
  • Linux Kernel Gets An "Enforcement Statement" To Deal With Copyright Trolls
    Greg Kroah-Hartman on the behalf of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board has today announced the Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement. This statement is designed to better fend off copyright trolls. Among the copyright troll concerns is how a Netfilter developer has been trying to enforce his personal copyright claims against companies for "in secret and for large sums of money by threatening or engaging in litigation."
  • An enforcement clarification from the kernel community
    The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory board, in response to concerns about exploitative license enforcement around the kernel, has put together this patch adding a document to the kernel describing its view of license enforcement. This document has been signed or acknowledged by a long list of kernel developers. In particular, it seeks to reduce the effect of the "GPLv2 death penalty" by stating that a violator's license to the software will be reinstated upon a timely return to compliance.