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Red Hat and Fedora News

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  • Red Hat Updates Container Storage Platform as Market Strives for Maturity

    Red Hat’s container push continues with an announced update to its storage component. This follows the recent update to the Red Hat OpenShift Container platform.

  • 2017 Red Hat Government Symposium to Highlight the Role of Open Source in Meeting the Challenges of Government IT
  • A few fall conferences

    I was on the planning committee for Linux Plumbers so I ended up doing a bunch of behinds the scenes work in addition to the hallway track and going to the occasional session. Jon Corbet gave a talk about the kernel's limits to growth. He gave a version of this talk at Linaro Connect and I gave some thoughts about this previously. Most of my opinions there still stand. Grant Likely held a BoF about the upcoming ARM EBBR. If you've been following the arm64 server space, you may have heard of SBBR which is a boot specification for arm64 servers. The EBBR is something similar for embedded devices. As a Fedora maintainer, I'm happy to see this moving forward to make booting arm64 SBCs easier. There was a discussion about contiguous memory allocation for DMA. Some hardware vendors have discovered they get better performance if they use a contiguous block of memory despite possibly having an IOMMU. The proposal was to use the MAP_CONTIG with mmap to get appropriate memory. There wasn't a conclusion and discussion is ongoing on the mailing list.

  • New Adventures: Ansible Edition

    I am honored, excited, nervous, humbled, and over all elated to announce that starting December 1, 2017 I will be a member of the Ansible Core Development Team at Red Hat where I will work primarily on Upstream Ansible (what most people would likely know as just 'Ansible', 'Ansible Core', or 'The Ansible Project' depending on who you talk to).

  • DevConf.CZ 2018 CfP is OPEN

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Linux Scaling Benchmarks With The AMD Threadripper 2990WX In Various Workloads

While yesterday were the benchmarks showing how Linux games struggle to scale past a few CPU cores/threads, in this article is a look at the scaling performance of various applications/workloads under Linux up to 64 threads using the AMD Threadripper 2990WX. Here's a look at how the Linux performance changes in a variety of applications from one to sixty-four threads with this new HEDT processor. The benchmarks today are for mostly curiosity sake about Linux and the Threadripper 2990WX, particularly on the impact of 32 threads (cores) to 64 threads with SMT, etc. In the next few days is a much more interesting comparison and that is looking at the Windows Server 2019 vs. Linux performance on the Threadripper 2990WX at various SMT and CCX configurations. That should reveal a lot about Windows' scaling abilities given the immense interest this week in the Windows vs. Linux Threadripper performance. But for today are just these reference numbers. Read more

AryaLinux: A Distribution and a Platform

I’ll be honest, if you’re just a standard desktop user, AryaLinux is not for you. Although you can certainly get right to work on the desktop, if you need anything outside of the default applications, you might find it a bit too much trouble to bother with. If, on the other hand, you’re a developer, AryaLinux might be a great platform for you. Or, if you just want to see what it’s like to build a Linux distribution from scratch, AryaLinux is a pretty easy route. Even with its quirks, AryaLinux holds a lot of promise as both a Linux distribution and platform. If the developers can see to it to build a GUI front-end for the alps package manager, AryaLinux could make some serious noise. Read more

Lennart Jern: How Do You Fedora?

Lennart Jern is a Swedish-speaking Finn, who has been living in Umeå, Sweden, for about three years. He was born and raised in southern Finland where he obtained his master’s degree in applied mathematics. His time at university exposed Lennart’s true passion. “While at the university, I realized that computer science was really what I wanted to work with.” In order to follow his dream of working in computer science he moved to Sweden with his wife to pursue a master’s program in computer science. After a short while he had learned enough to land a job with a local startup. “I’m working with cloud/distributed systems, specifically with tools like kubernetes and OpenShift.” Lennart’s first contact with Linux was in 2006. Some of the computers in his high school were running OpenSuse. He installed Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron in 2008 and has been using Linux ever since. Read more