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Security: Equifax, Forrester, Akamai, Disqus, WhatsApp, FBI, Accenture

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Security
  • Equifax will give your salary history to anyone with your SSN and date of birth
  • Forrester Research Discloses Limited Website Data Breach

    At 6:17 ET PM on Oct.6, Forrester Research publicly admitted that it was the victim of a cyber-attack. According to the firm, the attack had limited impact, with no evidence that confidential client data had been stolen.

    According to Forrester Research's preliminary investigation, attackers were able to gain access to Forrester.com content that was intended to be limited exclusively to clients.

    "We recognize that hackers will attack attractive targets—in this case, our research IP," George F. Colony, chairman and chief executive officer of Forrester, stated.

    "We also understand there is a tradeoff between making it easy for our clients to access our research and security measures," Colony added. "We feel that we have taken a common-sense approach to those two priorities; however, we will continuously look at that balance to respond to changing cyber-security risk."

  • Akamai Reports Fast Flux Botnets Remain a Security Risk

    Attackers are continuing to benefit from the use many different technique to remain hidden. New research released Oct.10 by Akamai reveals that a botnet with over 14,000 IP addresses has been using the fast flux DNS technique to evade detection, while still causing damage to users and organizations.

    Fast Flux is an attacker technique that uses the Domain Name System (DNS) to hide the source of an attack. DNS operates by referring a domain name to a specific IP address

  • Disqus reveals data breach, but wins points for transparency

    Disqus has publicly announced that its user database leaked in 2012, exposing the usernames, email addresses, sign-up dates, and last login dates of more than 17 million users.

    In addition, the data included crackable SHA1-hashed passwords of “about one-third” of users. Presumably many accounts registered with the popular blog-commenting service do not have associated passwords due to many users signing-in using third-party social media accounts such as Google or Facebook.

    Quite how the security breach occurred is currently a mystery, and – frankly – despite their good intentions, Disqus may find it difficult to pinpoint exactly what happened five years after the event.

  • WhatsApp Exploit Can Allow Hackers To Monitor Your Sleep And Other Things
  • Multi-Layered Defenses Needed to Improve Cyber-Security, FBI Says
  • Hacking is inevitable, so it’s time to assume our data will be stolen

    If recent hacking attacks such as the one at Equifax, which compromised personal data for about half of all Americans, have taught us anything, it’s that data breaches are a part of life. It’s time to plan for what happens after our data is stolen, according to Rahul Telang, professor of information systems at Carnegie Mellon University.

    Companies are prone to understating the scale of hacks, which suggests that there needs to be better standards for disclosing breaches. Yahoo recently confessed that its data breach actually impacted 3 billion user accounts, three times what it disclosed in December. Equifax also boosted the number of people it says were affected by its hack.

  • 7 Security Risks User and Entity Behavior Analytics Helps Detect
  • UpGuard Reports Accenture Data Exposure, Debuts Risk Detection Service

    Security vendor UpGuard announced on Oct.10 that it discovered that global consulting firm Accenture had left at least four cloud-based storage servers publicly available. UpGuard alleges that the exposed cloud servers could have left Accenture customers to risk, though Accenture is publicly downplaying the impact of the cloud data exposure.

    "There was no risk to any of our clients – no active credentials, PII and other sensitive information was compromised," Accenture noted in a statement sent to eWEEK. "The information involved could not have provided access to client systems and was not production data or applications."

    Accenture added that the company has a multi-layered security model and the data in question would not have allowed anyone that found it to penetrate any of those layers.

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