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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Reasons Kubernetes is cool

    When I first learned about Kubernetes (a year and a half ago?) I really didn’t understand why I should care about it.

    I’ve been working full time with Kubernetes for 3 months or so and now have some thoughts about why I think it’s useful. (I’m still very far from being a Kubernetes expert!) Hopefully this will help a little in your journey to understand what even is going on with Kubernetes!

    I will try to explain some reason I think Kubenetes is interesting without using the words “cloud native”, “orchestration”, “container”, or any Kubernetes-specific terminology Smile. I’m going to explain this mostly from the perspective of a kubernetes operator / infrastructure engineer, since my job right now is to set up Kubernetes and make it work well.

  • Simon Phipps - President of Open Source Initiative
  • Mining Ethereum With AMD Threadrippers Paired With Four RX Vega 64 GPUs

    If you do not have time to read the full article here the short version in one sentence: No, it is not practical to run Ethereum on AMD Vega 64 graphics cards on Linux because the ROCm OpenCL stack in the AMDGPU-PRO 17.30 is very slow in Ethereum so the whole system with four Vega64 cards make 16-23Mh/s and even a single old AMD-RX470 with the old Closed-source OpenCL AMDGPU-PRO stack run ~20+ Mh/s... This all could be the effect of the exponential function Ethereum-ICE-AGE Bomb...

  • Chef Habitat Builder Debuts for Container Cloud-Native App Deployments

    DevOps vendor Chef announced the launch of its Habitat Builder software-as-a-service (SaaS) offering on Oct. 9, providing new automation capabilities for developers who work with containerized cloud-native applications.

    Habitat Builder is an extension of Chef's open-source Habitat automation technology that debuted in June 2016. With the original Habitat project, Chef provided developers with tools to help automate package code for different platforms. The new Habitat Builder effort goes a step further, providing a SaaS platform for developers to both build and deploy container applications for different cloud and container orchestration platforms.

  • fwupd hits 1.0.0

    Today I released fwupd version 1.0.0, a version number most Open Source projects seldom reach. Unusually it bumps the soname so any applications that link against libfwupd will need to be rebuilt. The reason for bumping is that we removed a lot of the cruft we’ve picked up over the couple of years since we started the project, and also took the opportunity to rename some public interfaces that are now used differently to how they were envisaged. Since we started the project, we’ve basically re-architected the way the daemon works, re-imagined how the metadata is downloaded and managed, and changed core ways we’ve done the upgrades themselves. It’s no surprise that removing all that crufty code makes the core easier to understand and maintain. I’m intending to support the 0_9_X branch for a long time, as that’s what’s going to stay in Fedora 26 and the upcoming Fedora 27.

  • Fwupd 1.0.0 Released To Advance Linux Firmware Updating

    Richard Hughes has announced the release of fwupd 1.0.0 today, the utility increasingly being used by many vendors for supporting updating of device firmware/microcode on Linux.

    With fwupd 1.0, there is ABI breakage as they removed a lot of cruft that built up over the years and also sought to improve some of the interfaces for this firmware updating project and its daemon. Fwupd 0.9 meanwhile will continue to be maintained for existing users not yet migrating to v1.0.

  • Letrs – A Cloud-Based Font Manager for Developers and Designers

    Letrs is a beautiful cloud-based font manager for developers and designers alike. It is also an ever-growing catalog of Typefaces which you can search for and activate to use on your computer and in your projects.

    It features a minimalist User Interface with a green, black, dark blue, and white color scheme. As you would expect from a cloud-based application, it works with an online account to which all your selected and uploaded fonts, teams, and search history is saved.

  • KMail User Survey Results, Part 1

    Back in August, we ran a survey to get input from our users and get a better understanding of how they use KMail. First, let me start by thanking everyone who took their time to fill in the survey. We collected over 3000 responses which is much more than we expected. Thank you very much! We got some interesting numbers and data from the survey, which I’ll analyze later, but to my big surprise, the most interesting part was the comments that many of you left at the end of the survey. We got over 1000 comments which provided us with a consistent feedback from the userbase. In this and the next blog posts, I want to address the common themes, complaints, and remarks that appeared in the comments, address the concerns raised and present some action plans that we are going to take to address those.

  • KTextEditorPreviewPlugin 0.2.0

    The KTextEditorPreviewPlugin software provides the KTextEditor Document Preview Plugin, a plugin for the editor Kate, the IDE KDevelop, or other software using the KTextEditor framework.

  • SUSE and SAP: Shared Roots Produce Fruit [Ed: This is an ad, but Linux Journal does not mark it as such]

More in Tux Machines

FreeNAS, World’s Most Popular Storage OS, Gets AMD Ryzen Support, Cloud Sync

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Amazon Linux 2 Benchmarks, 6-Way Linux OS EC2 Compute Cloud Comparison

With Amazon AWS this week having released Amazon Linux 2 LTS I was excited to put this updated cloud-focused operating system through some performance tests to see how it stacks up with the more well known Linux distributions. Read more

Open Source “PiTalk” Turns Your Raspberry Pi Minicomputer Into A Modular Smartphone

More than a year ago, I wrote about a Raspberry Pi-powered phone called PiPhone, and the readers loved it. Just recently, I came across another similar project on Kickstarter and decided to share it on Fossbytes. Named PiTalk, the project calls itself the “first ever DIY modular smartphone.” Powered by Python, PiTalk modular smartphone is compatible with Raspberry Pi Zero, Pi 2, and Pi 3. For voice and data communication, it has a 3G module. The basic features performed by PiTalk are: Read more

antiX MX-17 Linux OS Brings Latest Debian GNU/Linux 9.3 "Stretch" Updates

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