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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Reasons Kubernetes is cool

    When I first learned about Kubernetes (a year and a half ago?) I really didn’t understand why I should care about it.

    I’ve been working full time with Kubernetes for 3 months or so and now have some thoughts about why I think it’s useful. (I’m still very far from being a Kubernetes expert!) Hopefully this will help a little in your journey to understand what even is going on with Kubernetes!

    I will try to explain some reason I think Kubenetes is interesting without using the words “cloud native”, “orchestration”, “container”, or any Kubernetes-specific terminology Smile. I’m going to explain this mostly from the perspective of a kubernetes operator / infrastructure engineer, since my job right now is to set up Kubernetes and make it work well.

  • Simon Phipps - President of Open Source Initiative
  • Mining Ethereum With AMD Threadrippers Paired With Four RX Vega 64 GPUs

    If you do not have time to read the full article here the short version in one sentence: No, it is not practical to run Ethereum on AMD Vega 64 graphics cards on Linux because the ROCm OpenCL stack in the AMDGPU-PRO 17.30 is very slow in Ethereum so the whole system with four Vega64 cards make 16-23Mh/s and even a single old AMD-RX470 with the old Closed-source OpenCL AMDGPU-PRO stack run ~20+ Mh/s... This all could be the effect of the exponential function Ethereum-ICE-AGE Bomb...

  • Chef Habitat Builder Debuts for Container Cloud-Native App Deployments

    DevOps vendor Chef announced the launch of its Habitat Builder software-as-a-service (SaaS) offering on Oct. 9, providing new automation capabilities for developers who work with containerized cloud-native applications.

    Habitat Builder is an extension of Chef's open-source Habitat automation technology that debuted in June 2016. With the original Habitat project, Chef provided developers with tools to help automate package code for different platforms. The new Habitat Builder effort goes a step further, providing a SaaS platform for developers to both build and deploy container applications for different cloud and container orchestration platforms.

  • fwupd hits 1.0.0

    Today I released fwupd version 1.0.0, a version number most Open Source projects seldom reach. Unusually it bumps the soname so any applications that link against libfwupd will need to be rebuilt. The reason for bumping is that we removed a lot of the cruft we’ve picked up over the couple of years since we started the project, and also took the opportunity to rename some public interfaces that are now used differently to how they were envisaged. Since we started the project, we’ve basically re-architected the way the daemon works, re-imagined how the metadata is downloaded and managed, and changed core ways we’ve done the upgrades themselves. It’s no surprise that removing all that crufty code makes the core easier to understand and maintain. I’m intending to support the 0_9_X branch for a long time, as that’s what’s going to stay in Fedora 26 and the upcoming Fedora 27.

  • Fwupd 1.0.0 Released To Advance Linux Firmware Updating

    Richard Hughes has announced the release of fwupd 1.0.0 today, the utility increasingly being used by many vendors for supporting updating of device firmware/microcode on Linux.

    With fwupd 1.0, there is ABI breakage as they removed a lot of cruft that built up over the years and also sought to improve some of the interfaces for this firmware updating project and its daemon. Fwupd 0.9 meanwhile will continue to be maintained for existing users not yet migrating to v1.0.

  • Letrs – A Cloud-Based Font Manager for Developers and Designers

    Letrs is a beautiful cloud-based font manager for developers and designers alike. It is also an ever-growing catalog of Typefaces which you can search for and activate to use on your computer and in your projects.

    It features a minimalist User Interface with a green, black, dark blue, and white color scheme. As you would expect from a cloud-based application, it works with an online account to which all your selected and uploaded fonts, teams, and search history is saved.

  • KMail User Survey Results, Part 1

    Back in August, we ran a survey to get input from our users and get a better understanding of how they use KMail. First, let me start by thanking everyone who took their time to fill in the survey. We collected over 3000 responses which is much more than we expected. Thank you very much! We got some interesting numbers and data from the survey, which I’ll analyze later, but to my big surprise, the most interesting part was the comments that many of you left at the end of the survey. We got over 1000 comments which provided us with a consistent feedback from the userbase. In this and the next blog posts, I want to address the common themes, complaints, and remarks that appeared in the comments, address the concerns raised and present some action plans that we are going to take to address those.

  • KTextEditorPreviewPlugin 0.2.0

    The KTextEditorPreviewPlugin software provides the KTextEditor Document Preview Plugin, a plugin for the editor Kate, the IDE KDevelop, or other software using the KTextEditor framework.

  • SUSE and SAP: Shared Roots Produce Fruit [Ed: This is an ad, but Linux Journal does not mark it as such]

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: Interview, Releases, Events, Compliance and Finance

Linux Foundation Expansion and Linux Development

  • Deutsche Telekom signs up as platinum member of Linux Foundation Networking
    Deutsche Telekom has doubled down on its commitment to using open source by signing up as a platinum member of Linux Foundation Networking. Earlier this year, the Linux Foundation put some of its open source communities, including the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), under the Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) brand in order to foster cross-project collaboration. Mainly thanks to ONAP, the LNF projects currently enable close to 70% of all the world's global mobile subscribers.
  • Deutsche Telekom Joins The Linux Foundation, Deepens Investment in Open Source Networking
  • Samsung Galaxy S Support With The Linux 4.19 Kernel
    Just in case you have your hands still on the Samsung Galaxy S or Galaxy S 4G that were released back in 2010 as once high-end Android smartphones, they have DeviceTree support with the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle. The DeviceTree additions are currently staged ahead of the Linux 4.19 kernel for these S5Pv210 Aries based smartphones. With this code in place for Linux 4.19, the Galaxy S should at least see working mainline support for storage, PMIC, RTC, fuel gauge, keys, USB, and WiFi working in order.
  • Using the Best CPU Available on Asymmetric Systems
    This is the type of situation with a patch where it might look like a lack of opposition could let it sail into the kernel tree, but really, it just hasn't been thoroughly examined by Linux bigwigs yet. Once the various contributors have gotten the patch as good as they can get it without deeper feedback, they'll probably send it up the ladder for inclusion in the main source tree. At that point, the security folks will jump all over it, looking for ways that a malicious user might force processes all onto only one particular CPU (essentially mounting a denial-of-service attack) or some such thing. Even if the patch survives that scrutiny, one of the other big-time kernel people, or even Linus Torvalds, could reject the patch on the grounds that it should represent a solution for large-scale systems as well as small. Either way, something like Dietmar and Quentin's patch will be desirable in the kernel, because it's always good to take advantages of the full range of abilities of a system. And nowadays, a lot of devices are coming out with asymmetric CPUs and other quirks that never were part of earlier general-purpose systems. So, there's definitely a lot to be gained in seeing this sort of patch go into the tree.

Games: Risin' Goat, CorsixTH, Hegemone Pass, Unreal Engine

Software: Remote Access, EncryptPad, Aria2 WebUI, Qbs

  • Best Linux remote desktop clients of 2018
    This article has been fully updated, and was provided to TechRadar by Linux Format, the number one magazine to boost your knowledge on Linux, open source developments, distro releases and much more. It appeared in issue 220, published February 2017. Subscribe to the print or digital version of Linux Format here. SSH has been the staple remote access tool for system administrators from day one. Admins use SSH to mount remote directories, backup remote servers, spring-clean remote databases, and even forward X11 connections. The popularity of single-board computers, such as the Raspberry Pi, has introduced SSH into the parlance of everyday desktop users as well. While SSH is useful for securely accessing one-off applications, it’s usually overkill, especially if you aren’t concerned about the network’s security. There are times when you need to remotely access the complete desktop session rather than just a single application. You may want to guide the person on the other end through installing software or want to tweak settings on a Windows machine from the comfort of your Linux desktop yourself.
  • EncryptPad: Encrypted Text Editor For Your Secrets
    EncryptPad is a simple, free and open source text editor that encrypts saved text files and allows protecting them with passwords, key files, or both. It's available on Windows, macOS, and Linux. The application comes with a GUI as well as a command line interface, and it also offers a tool for encrypting and decrypting binary files.
  • Aria2 WebUI: Clean Web Frontend for aria2
    Aria2 WebUI is an open source web frontend for aria2. The software bills itself as the finest interface to interact with aria2. That’s a lofty goal considering the competition from the likes of uGet Download Manager (which offers an aria2 plugin). Aria2 WebUI started as part of the GSOC program 2012. But a lot has changed since the software’s creation under that initiative. While the pace of development has lessened considerably in recent years, the software has not been abandoned.
  • qbs 1.12 released
    We are happy to announce version 1.12.0 of the Qbs build tool. [...] All command descriptions now list the product name to which the generated artifact belongs. This is particularly helpful for larger projects where several products contain files of the same name, or even use the same source file. The vcs module no longer requires a repository to create the header file. If the project is not in a repository, then the VCS_REPO_STATE macro will evaluate to a placeholder string. It is now possible to generate Makefiles from Qbs projects. While it is unlikely that complex Qbs projects are completely representable in the Makefile format, this feature might still be helpful for debugging purposes.