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Using Compiz in KDE on Fedora Core 6

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Well, as I already said, Fedora Core 6 is out - and it is pretty amazing!

Ok, I have to admit that the install (I normally reinstall which is no problem since my home has its own partition) wasn’t easy at all. Grub wasn’t set up properly, and I had to reinstall it with the repair tools. Additionally localhost (!) wasn’t set up right for ipv4 which I had to correct as well. But after that everything worked fine.

And I have to admit, the new system works great. Ok, sure, since FC is a de-facto GNOME distribution, most of the improvements are there - but that’s ok, I know how to change my way to get KDE running on the provided system.

Full Tip.

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