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Desktop/Mobile: Google Pixelbook, The Geezer and the Penguin, ThinkPad Anniversary, Pixel 2 and Purism’s Linux Phone

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  • Google Pixelbook hands-on: Stunning hardware with the usual limited OS

    The Google Pixelbook is the latest in a line of flagship Chrome OS laptops that are extremely nice and extremely expensive. If it ran anything other than Chrome OS, it would be a top-tier laptop, but it does run Chrome OS, so for $1,000, it's kind of a hard sell.

    Boy, is it a sharp piece of hardware. It's wrapped in aluminum, like previous Chromebook Pixels. The palm rest is covered in a rubbery silicon pad, which feels fantastic to rest your wrists on while typing. It also serves as a great gripping point when you fold the laptop into its various modes. Hopefully this surface can stand up to the wear and tear of a laptop palm rest.

    The back has a top glass panel, just like the Pixel Phones, which serves to let wireless signals in and out. The screen has a glass cover, too, along with the trackpad. The Google Hardware division is clearly working hard to make its products look like a cohesive family, and you can tell the basis for the Pixelbook's back design is the white-and-silver Google Pixel. Just like the phone, the laptop has a silver-colored metal body with a contrasting, white-colored glass back. The only problem is that the silver/white color scheme only matches last year's Google Pixel. This year, a silver body is not an option on the Pixel 2. So close, Google!

  • The Geezer and the Penguin

    Microsoft was not interested in giving away any secrets, of course, but I found there was a whole different system called Linux that was famous for revealing every detail of how its software operated.

    At the time, Linux was often described in the general press as being for geeks only, but all the people who seemed to know something about it said Linux just took a bit of learning-by-experience – you didn't have to be an IT expert. In my archives I've saved an article from 2007 in PC Magazine by Neil Randall titled "Linux – you can do it!" That's the one that really gave me hope.

  • Lenovo Unwraps the 25th Anniversary ThinkPad [Ed: much to celebrate though?]

    Lenovo chose to unwrap the limited-edition anniversary version of its most famous laptop on the ThinkPad’s 25th birthday

  • Lenovo’s 25th Anniversary ThinkPad brings back the keyboard we love
  • 6 Times Google Made Fun Of Apple At Pixel 2 Launch Event
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  • Crowdfunder for a free/open phone crosses $1M mark

    One of the holy grails of free and open computing is a really great free/open phone; it's been tried many times before without much success, but a new crowdfunder from Purism (who make a pretty great free/open laptop) has just crossed the $1,000,000 mark and is on track to hit its target of $1.5M in the next 18 days.

  • Purism’s Linux Phone Crowdfunder Just Passed $1 Million

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GitHub’s tool reduces open source software license violations

GitHub has open-sourced its Licensed tool, a Ruby gem that caches and verifies the status of license dependencies in Git repos. Licensed has helped GitHub engineers who use open source software find potential problems with license dependencies early in the development cycle. The tool reports any dependencies needing review. Read more