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Oracle Linux uncovered

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Linux
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Yesterday Oracle announced the release of their own version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, simply called Enterprise Linux or 'Unbreakable Linux'. In a remarkably similar move to such projects as CentOS, Oracle have decided to remove all Red Hat specific trademarks and brand it as their own (all quite legit, of course).

They will be supplying bugfixes for this new version, and will also be synchronising it with future releases of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. We decided to take a peek at what Oracle had come up with. Read on for a first-look, and the Linux Format team's opinions...

Installation

With no Red Hats or Fedoras present, the Enterprise Linux splash screen appears, along with the uber-corporate Oracle logo. Hit Enter to start the install process and go to the initial text-based screens so commonly found in Fedora/Red Hat distros. Star Trek fans may shiver when they notice that it is simply referred to as Enterprise during the first text-based screens. (Click the following screenshots for full-size versions.)

Full Story.

Uncompatible Linux

Ok, I downloaded Oracle’s Unbreakable Linux to give it a spin in VMware. Initial thoughts: It’s broken, I call bullshit, Larry Ellison!

I downloaded the four CDs from Oracle, they were in zip format. The CD ISOs are about the same size as CentOS CDs. (And for those of you curious, Oracle does not make Breakable Linux available on a single DVD like CentOS.) I unzipped all four files and fired up VMware.

In VMware, I created a VM for Breakable Linux:

Full Story.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Aus stockbroker picks Oracle Linux support

Melbourne company Opes Prime Stockbroking has declared it will drop Red Hat for its underwhelming Linux support service and switch to Oracle instead.

The equity financing company's announcement comes on the back of Oracle's declaration in the US Wednesday that it will offer full-scale support for Red Hat Linux. Opes has used Red Hat for its support services since adopting the platform 18 months ago.

A firm of about 50 staff, Opes manages AU$1 billion in Australian assets. Its systems interface to 2,300 retail customers and intermediaries. The stockbroker runs two 10g databases, two Oracle application servers and Oracle's SOA Suite as a key system.

Full Story.
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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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