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Review: Ubuntu Edgy is nice, but not so edgy

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu team is scheduled to release Ubuntu 6.10, codenamed Edgy Eft, today. After working with beta and release candidates over the last few weeks, I've found it to be a solid and usable upgrade for Dapper -- but not a particularly cutting-edge release.

The release is available as a live CD desktop installer for x86, AMD64, and PowerPC, and there's a server install CD for x86, PowerPC, AMD64, and UltraSPARC systems. For OEM systems, systems with less than 192MB of RAM, and other special cases, an alternate install CD is available for x86, PowerPC, and AMD64.

Installation of Ubuntu is easy enough. I've walked through the install on a few machines using the live CD installer for Ubuntu and Kubuntu, and installed Ubuntu server on VMware Server. In all cases, the installation was simple and worked without a glitch. Depending on the speed of your machine, installation should take between 20 minutes and an hour, with most of that time devoted to copying files in the background.

Full Story.

Ubuntu Just Works

I recently downloaded Ubuntu 6.06 and tried it out on my laptop (an HP zt3000). It comes as a "Live CD" which means that you can insert it into a PC that only has Windows installed and when you reboot the machine it can load and run Ubuntu Linux directly off the CD to let you try it without installing anything. But you can also use the same CD to do an installation of the OS onto a machine as well.

Full Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Edgy: Day 1

The install started out a bit rocky. First of, the alternate cd was VERY slow. I eventually got errors about broken packages during the install.

Now my system is faster than Dapper ever was (even though I’m using more effects). I am very pleased with Edgy, and everything worked out of the box.

Little More Here.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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