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Distribution Release: Ubuntu 6.10

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 6.10, the latest version of the popular Linux distribution for desktops and servers, has been released: "The Ubuntu team is proud to announce the release of Ubuntu 6.10, codenamed 'Edgy Eft'.

This release includes both installable Desktop CDs and alternate text-mode installation CDs for several architectures. Highlights of this release include: Tomboy, an easy-to-use and efficient note-taking tool; F-Spot, a photo management tool that enables tagging, photo editing and automatic uploading to on-line web management sites; GNOME 2.16; substantially faster startup and shutdown with eye-catching high-resolution graphics; the latest Firefox 2.0 web browser.

More Here.

Release Announcement.

Ubuntu Homepage.

Downloads.

Distribution Release: Kubuntu 6.10

The Kubuntu project has announced the release of Kubuntu 6.10, code name "Edgy Eft": "Kubuntu 6.10 has been released and is available for download now. Kubuntu 6.10 brings a bit of edginess to this release, including a new and improved desktop, artwork, applications and much more." Some of the more interesting features of Kubuntu 6.10 include: KDE 3.5.5 desktop.

More Here w/ download links.

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