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Ubuntu: *Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 2, 32-Bit, ARTIK, and IoT modules

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Final Beta Ready for Download, Here's What's New

    Canonical today released the Final Beta release of its forthcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, allowing anyone to see what they prepared for this new Ubuntu version that will be hitting the streets on October 19, 2017.

    First and foremost, Ubuntu 17.10 is shipping with a refreshed desktop environment, powered by the latest GNOME 3.26 release, highly customized by Canonical to resemble the look and feel of its deprecated Unity user interface. This is also the first release of Ubuntu to ship without Unity in more than six years.

  • An Ubuntu Kernel Spin Of AMDGPU DC "drm-next-4.15-dc"

    Yesterday was the very exciting news of the AMDGPU DC code finally being called for pulling to DRM-Next for integration in the Linux 4.15 kernel. So far it's looking like that will indeed happen for Linux 4.15 assuming Linus Torvalds has no objections. If you want to test out this kernel for HDMI/DP audio, Radeon RX Vega display support, atomic mode-setting, or other modern features, here is an Ubuntu kernel spin.

  • Canonical to end 32-bit installation options with Ubuntu 17.10 Linux

    Ubuntu, arguably the most popular (or, at least, widely used) desktop distribution of Linux, is to drop support for 32-bit installations in favour of 64-bit - some 14 years after the introduction of the AMD64 instruction set.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 for desktop won't ship a 32-bit version

    Beginning with Ubuntu 17.10, due next month, Canonical will stop building 32-bit versions of its operating system for desktop machines. The move has been pushed by Dimitri Ledkov, a familiar name which cropped up in a Neowin article last year discussing the same topic. If you have a 32-bit machine running Ubuntu you should probably stick with Ubuntu 16.04 and start looking for a replacement device.

  • Ubuntu to stop releasing 32-bit desktop ISOs

    But it seems like not all that many people are using recent builds of Ubuntu to do that… because the developers have decided to make it a bit tougher to install the popular Linux distro on computers with 32-bit processors.

  • Samsung selects Ubuntu 16.04 as primary Linux distro for some ARTIK IoT modules

    Next month, Ubuntu 17.10 will be released. Even after that release, version 16.04 will remain the most recent LTS version. If you aren't familiar, LTS stands for "Long Term Support," which quite literally means it is supported by Canonical for a longer period of time. For instance, Ubuntu 16.04 will be supported until 2021, while the newer 17.04 is only supported until 2018.

    Today, Canonical announces that Samsung has selected version 16.04 LTS of the operating system as the primary Linux distro for some of the ARTIK internet of things modules. This is a smart choice by Samsung, because long support is preferable to bleeding edge for an IoT device.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Primary Linux OS of Samsung ARTIK 5 and 7 Smart IoT Modules

    Canonical recently partnered with Samsung to bring its Ubuntu Linux operating system to the Samsung ARTIK 5 and 7 family of smart IoT (Internet of Things) modules used in a wide-range of appliances.

    Samsung decided to enable the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) operating system as primary GNU/Linux distribution for its Samsung ARTIK platform instead of the existing OS, which wasn't mentioned in the press announcement. Choosing Ubuntu as primary Linux distro is a great move as it lets ARTIK’s developers access various of the supported connectivity options, such as Zigbee, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth.

  • Canonical's eyes are on IoT

    When Mark Shuttleworth founded Canonical in 2004, the idea behind the company was simple – promote the use of Ubuntu Linux as a desktop operating system. Fourteen years later, things have gotten a lot more complicated, as the prominent open source software vendor eyes the IoT market.

    Canonical’s still flying the flag for desktop Linux, but the company’s real business is in the cloud – it claims that Ubuntu accounts for about 60% of all Linux instances in the major public clouds – and it’s hoping to make its mark in the next-buzziest part of the technology sector, the Internet of Things.

    According to Mike Bell, Canonical’s executive vice president for devices and IoT, the way businesses have begun to develop software for IoT devices has been advantageous for them – companies have started to take server or desktop distros and cut them down into software that works on embedded devices. Since Ubuntu is a familiar and well-known framework, it was a natural choice as a starting place.

More about Beta 2

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 2 Flavours Available to Download

    Pitching up alongside the main Ubuntu 17.10 beta release are new beta builds of the various official Ubuntu flavors. Among the many spins choosing to take part in this round of testing is the marvellous Ubuntu MATE, brilliant Ubuntu Budgie, and, er, Xubuntu.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 2 Released, This Is What’s New

    Right you, it’s time to fumble around for the nearest USB thumb drive, stick the kettle on, and lean back in that chintzy IKEA chair of yours — Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 2 is now available to download.

    This is the first official testing milestone that the regular version of Ubuntu desktop has taken part in during the ‘Artful Aardvark’ development cycle (it sits out the alpha round of testing).

    That makes this beta download your first formal chance to go hands on and help test everything that’s included.

  • Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) final Beta images now available

    Artful Aardvark (17.10) final Beta images are now available for testing. Help us make 17.10 the best release yet!

    The Kubuntu team will be releasing 17.10 on October 19, 2017.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 17.10: What’s New? [Video]

It’s Artful Aardvark arrival day today (no, really!) and to mark the occasion we’ve made our first video in 3 years! Prime your eyeballs and pop in some earbuds as we (try to) bring you up to speed on what’s new in Ubuntu 17.10. At a smidgen over 3 minutes long we think our video is perfect for watching on your commute; when you’re bleary eyed in bed; or when you get the tl;dr feels thinking about our fuller, longer, and far wordier Ubuntu 17.10 review (due out shortly). Read more

Radeon Linux Gaming Performance: Ubuntu 17.04 vs. Ubuntu 17.10

With Ubuntu 17.10 set to ship tomorrow that features just not an upgraded Linux kernel and Mesa 3D stack but also transitions from Unity 7 + X.Org to GNOME Shell + Wayland, here are some comparison gaming benchmarks on a few different AMD Radeon graphics cards. Ubuntu 17.04 shipped six months ago with Linux 4.10 and Mesa 17.0.7 as the main graphics components for open-source driver users while now with Ubuntu 17.10 is the Linux 4.13 kernel and Mesa 17.2.2. The six months of improvements to Mesa alone are massive for Intel and Radeon users with the RADV/ANV Vulkan drivers maturing much over this time (17.10 still doesn't ship with the Vulkan drivers, but are just a sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers away) as well as many performance improvements and new extensions for the growing number of bundled OpenGL drivers. If you read Phoronix daily, you should already be well versed on the many Mesa accomplishments over this time span. Read more

Linux on Galaxy is Samsung's most impressive DeX app yet

Alongside the Galaxy S8/S8+, Samsung also introduced DeX to the world this past February. DeX is Samsung's vision for the future of desktop computing, and while it still has a way to go before it's truly useful or practical for everyone, Linux on Galaxy is a new app that Samsung hopes will make DeX more appealing to developers. Samsung announced Linux on Galaxy at its developer conference on October 18, and although the app is still in a trial phase, it already sounds pretty impressive. Read more Also: Samsung unveils 'Linux on Galaxy' for DeX -- run Fedora and Ubuntu on your Note8?

Skylake embedded computer has a thin 1U profile

Advantech has expanded its line of fanless, barebone EPC computers with a 43mm high “EPC-T1232” system based on a Skylake U-series thin Mini-ITX board. In August, Advantech launched its Linux-ready AIMB-232 thin Mini-ITX SBC featuring 6th Gen “Skylake” U-Series CPUs. Now it has followed up with an EPC-T1232 barebone computer based on the SBC, or specifically, the AIMB-T12325W-00Y0E model. Like the SBC, the EPC-T1232 has a low profile, measuring 250 x 210 x 43mm. Read more