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Linux Mint 18.3 to Be Dubbed "Sylvia," Enables HiDPI by Default in Cinnamon 3.6

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Linux

Linux Mint project leader and creator Clement Lefebvre published today a new monthly newsletter to inform us all about some of the upcoming features coming to the Linux Mint 18.3 operating system later this fall.

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Also: Monthly News – September 2017

Linux Mint 18.3 Ubuntu-based operating system is named 'Sylvia'

Linux Mint Continues Working On HiDPI Improvements

Linux Mint 18.3 Will Feature More HiDPI Improvements

  • Linux Mint 18.3 Will Feature More HiDPI Improvements

    Linux Mint is planning some big HiDPI improvements for its next major release.

    Big enough to see HiDPI enabled by default in Cinnamon 3.6.

    Those using Linux Mint on a device with a HiDPI display currently have to dive into the display settings to double UI scaling (200%).

    From the vague commitment to improve HiDPI in Cinnamon 3.6 on Linux Mint 18.3 it sounds like the distro will detect when scaling should be enabled and apply it automatically.

    No word on whether/if fractional scaling (1.25, 1.5 etc) will be implemented. Based on the terse conclusion to this bug report filed against Cinnamon, I’d say no!

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