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Space tourist promotes open source

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Ubuntu

On this week's edition of BBC technology programme Digital Planet South African space tourist and open source evangelist Mark Shuttleworth talks about the developing world's need for technology solutions.

As he walked across the campus of London's Imperial College, casually dressed in jeans and trainers, Mark Shuttleworth hardly stood out from the hordes of students making their way between lectures.

They were blissfully unaware that in their midst was a man who made a fortune in the dotcom explosion of the late 1990s, and unlike many less savvy entrepreneurs, held on to it. And that meant he could afford a nice holiday, so in 2002 he made headlines paying £14m ($20m) for a trip to the International Space Station.

Back on earth, through his philanthropic foundation, Shuttleworth has become a high profile advocate of open source software.

He's at Imperial College to record a video address on the subject to be shown to delegates at next week's Gov-Tech E-Government Conference in Pretoria, South Africa.

Full Story.

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