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The Voices of Mandriva

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Interviews
MDV

Mandriva Linux, once the most popular desktop GNU/Linux distribution, still enjoys an enthusiastic following and a positive cashflow, and has settled into the niche it established in 1999: a technologically advanced operating system that's easy to install, configure, and use without dumbing everything down. Last year's merger with Conectiva and Lycoris more than doubled the size of the company, bringing together hundreds of dedicated and experienced employees to further challenge the Red Hat and Novell desktop GNU/Linux stalwarts. Below are interviews with three of those everyday people who make Mandriva Linux and its surrounding community great.

Adam Williamson

Warly

Helio Chissini de Castro

Full Story.

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