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Ubuntu now more popular than Mac OS X!

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Ubuntu

Whats up everyone? I was just taking a look at Google Trends and I found out something interesting. Apparently Ubuntu Linux has not only surpassed its major competitor in Linux ( SuSE ) in popularity, as well as the distro it's based off of (Debian) , but it seems to have also surpassed another major competitor.

Yes, that's right! Apple Computer's very own Mac OS X has also been defeated in popularity by Ubuntu! Check it out for yourself. Here is a screenshot I took not 15 minutes ago.

Full Story.

Has Ubuntu Linux overtaken Mac OS X?

But judging by the comments Justin got in his blog, using Google Trends in the way he did isn't an exact science. Pointing out that there several permutations of the string "Mac OS X" that Google users might be using, many questioned the search string he used, offering suggestions for ones that might return more precise results.

Full Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Cute, but meaningless

Let's assume the blogger's extremely debatable conclusion that there are more Google searches for Ubuntu than OS X (which is not the search term he used). That wouldn't mean Ubuntu is more "popular" (whatever that means), it would just mean there are more Google searches done on Ubuntu.

(Just as Distrowatch's "page hit rankings" don't mean much in terms of which Linux distro is most popular. Personally, I really only visit a distro's page on Distrowatch if I've forgotten the URL to the its home page.)

What would be interesting is some sort of educated guess as to how many people have Ubuntu installed (vs. OS X, Windows, other Linux distros, etc.).

One problem is that Microsoft and Apple could tell you pretty acurately how many units of their OS they've sold, whether boxed or OEM, since they keep track of such things. (Not that they necessarily would...) There really isn't any way to tell how many people have actually installed Linux, let alone Ubuntu.
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><)))°> Kanotix: Making Linux work. http://kanotix.com

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