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IBM’s 'New Gen' LinuxONE

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Blockchain and Hyperledger/FOSS

  • American Express Integrates Blockchain To Its Membership Rewards Program
    Financial services corporation American Express (AmEx) has announced a blockchain application to its Membership Rewards program in partnership with online merchant Boxed, Associated Press reported May 23. AmEx announced that it is integrating blockchain technology developed by Hyperledger, an open source blockchain project under the Linux Foundation, to let merchants design customized offers for AmEx cardholders in order to increase customer engagement.
  • Interview: Riccardo Spagni co-founder of a new open source blockchain
    South African cryptocurrency expert and lead maintainer of the Monero project Riccardo “fluffypony” Spagni has co-founded a new open source blockchain protocol named Tari. Tari is being built as a blockchain protocol for managing, transferring, and using digital assets, and is stewarded by a team based in Johannesburg. The Johannesburg-based team will work on building a blockchain protocol as a second-layer solution on top of Monero, leveraging the existing cryptocurrency’s security while offering a scalable and dynamic platform for digital assets.
  • CheapAir Ditches BitPay For Open-Source Bitcoin Payments
    Travel and accommodation website CheapAir.com has appeared to choose self-hosted payment processor BTCPay for its Bitcoin payments, shunning industry stalwart BitPay. [...] Coinbase revealed it was retiring its merchant processing function in April, a move which the cryptocurrency industry condemned for its disruptive consequences. BitPay, a processor which along with Coinbase continues to be arguably the best-known option for Bitcoin payments, appeared to miss out on wooing CheapAir, meanwhile, which has offered Bitcoin since 2014 and was the first ever travel agency world-wide to accept bitcoin.
  • Ontology (ONT) Develops its Open-source Triones Consensus System economic model
    The Ontology (ONT) team uses the blockchain technology and the Internet to explore in-depth levels of the information industry. The team’s plans include developing an open-source distributed trust ecosystem called Triones Consensus System that’s based on the Ontology chain network.

Linux 4.16.12, 4.14.44, 4.9.103, 4.4.133, and 3.18.110

Wine 3.9 Released

Mozilla: WebAssembly, Mozilla Test Pilot, VR and Bootstrap

  • Testing GNU FreeDink in your browser
    This is a first version that can be polished further but it works quite well. This is the original C/C++/SDL2 code with a few tweaks, cross-compiled to WebAssembly (and an alternate version in asm.js) with emscripten. Nothing brand new I know, but things are getting smoother, and WebAssembly is definitely a performance boost. I like distributed and autonomous tools, so I'm generally not inclined to web-based solutions. In this case however, this is a local version of the game. There's no server side. Savegames are in your browser local storage. Even importing D-Mods (game add-ons) is performed purely locally in the in-memory virtual FS with a custom .tar.bz2 extractor cross-compiled to WebAssembly.
  • Welcome Punam to the Test pilot team!
    A couple months ago Punam transferred from another team at Mozilla to join the Test Pilot team. Below she answers some questions about her experience and what she’s looking forward to. Welcome, Punam! [...] Before Mozilla I have worked with SonicWall, eBay and Symantec doing web development.
  • This week in Mixed Reality: Issue 7
    Missed us last week? Our team met in Chicago for a work week. If you had the chance to come and meet us at the CHIVR / AR Chicago meetup, thanks for swinging by. We strategized our short and long term plans and we're really excited to share what we're unfolding in the coming weeks.
  • Why bootstrap?
    Over the next few quarters, I'm going to focus my attention on Mozilla's experimentation platform. One of the first questions we need to answer is how we're going to calculate and report the necessary measures of variance. Any experimentation platform needs to be able to compare metrics between two groups. For example, say we're looking at retention for a control and experiment group. Control shows a retention of 88.45% and experiment shows a retention of 90.11%. Did the experimental treatment cause a real increase in retention or did the experiment branch just get lucky when we assigned users? We need to calculate some measure of variance to be able to decide. The two most common methods to do this calculation are the frequentist's two-sample t-test or some form of the bootstrap. In ye olden days, we'd be forced to use the two-sample t-test. The bootstrap requires a lot of compute power that just wasn't available until recently. As you can imagine, the bootstrap is all the rage in the Data Science world. Of course it is. We get to replace statistics with raw compute power! That's the dream!